wpostServer: http://css.washingtonpost.com/wpost

The Post Most: Opinions

direct signup

Today’s Opinions poll

Should the United States fund the service program AmeriCorps? President Obama would increase its budget. Rep. Paul Ryan would eliminate federal funding for the program.

Submit
Next
Review your answers and share

Join a Discussion

There are no discussions scheduled today.

Weekly schedule, past shows

Post Partisan
Posted at 05:21 PM ET, 05/29/2012

One more thing about Obama, Jacob and race


The picture of President Obama bowing to Jacob Philadelphia so that the 5-year-old Oval Office visitor could touch his hair has touched countless people. When I wrote about that the photo speaks volumes about Obama and race, the response was immediate. There was even more when a version of it appeared in the dead-tree edition of The Post on Saturday. But an e-mail from Katharine Cooper-Arnold added even more to the conversation about the heart-tugging picture.
(Pete Souza/The White House)

Thank you for posting the photo of President Obama and Jacob. It elucidates very well your closing editorial comment: the President does not need to constantly speak about race. His actions and the actions of many of his detractors (who contrary to their denial seem like racists to me) keep the conversation alive in our country. Actually just seeing a photo of the president every day reminds me of race. As a white woman who was fortunate to be surrounded by strong black women when I was growing up, I have always felt that the assertion when President Obama was elected that race no longer mattered to be wishful thinking. Race is part of our collective conscious and unconscious in this country for better or worse. The first African-American president makes it better; birthers make it worse. But race matters. Just ask Jacob Philadelphia.

My eyes roll at every mention of post-racial this or race-doesn’t-matter that. Post-racial America is where unicorns live. By asking the question of Obama, even Jacob understood that race matters. But what he learned in that now-iconic moment is that race isn’t the impediment to success that it once was.

By  |  05:21 PM ET, 05/29/2012

 
Read what others are saying
     

    © 2011 The Washington Post Company