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Posted at 06:00 AM ET, 09/06/2011

Sarah Palin, ‘strippers’ and polls


There’s so much to say about the speech Sarah Palin gave to the Tea Party Nation rally in Iowa on Saturday. So, let me start with the most vivid of her pronouncements. Palin was mewling about how the “permanent political class” in Washington “don’t feel the same urgency that we do.”

But why should they? For them business is good; business is very good. Seven of the ten wealthiest suburbs are suburbs of Washington, D.C. Polls there actually — and usually I’ll say polls, eh, they’re for strippers and cross-country skiers — but polls in those parts actually show that some people there believe that the economy has actually improved. See, there may not be a recession in Georgetown, but there is in the rest of America.

Nice play on words, Palin (R-Snarklaska). But if the half-term Alaska governor gets into the race for president she’ll discover something that strippers and cross-country skiers know all too well: You’re nothing without strong poles.

Palin’s poll numbers have been horrendous. Considering they’ve only gotten worse since she was thrust upon us by Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) three years ago Saturday, they will always be horrendous. The latest bad poll was released last Thursday by Fox News. A stunning 74 percent of those surveyed in that national poll didn’t want the best-selling author to run. Only 10 percent of Iowa Republicans surveyed last month by Public Policy Polling expressed support for Palin. And a July poll by WMUR-University of New Hampshire poll put support for the reality television star at 3 percent among likely Republican voters. That’s down three points from a February poll by the university. The July survey had other bad news for Palin: Twenty-three percent of likely Republican voters in New Hampshire said they “would not support [her] under any circumstances.” That was the most of any of the GOP contenders.

But the graph below illustrates why it’s lunacy to think that Palin could run a credible campaign to oust President Obama from the White House.
If people are questioning whether Obama can hang on to the White House with an approval rating hovering in the low 40s, why on earth would anyone think Palin could beat him with a 59 percent disapproval rating?

By  |  06:00 AM ET, 09/06/2011

 
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