October 1, 2013
A U.S. Park Service employee puts a closed sign in the window of the World War II Memorial ticket office on the National Mall Tuesday. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
A U.S. Park Service employee puts a closed sign in the window of the World War II Memorial ticket office on the National Mall Tuesday. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Regardless of how we got here, the shutdown of 2013 is upon us. The Republicans should not blink now. Using the budget to try to stop an unpopular, destructive, disorganized, partisan law is no vice. Yes, it would be preferable to not be in this position. But there is still an important point to be made and some good that can be done.
‎Even though the Democrats and many in the mainstream media would have you believe that the shutdown was caused by Republicans’ anarchic insanity or psychotic compulsion, Republicans stand ready to fund 99.9 percent of the government. They also have reasonably offered to negotiate the future of the train wreck that is Obamacare.

There is no real legislative process under President Obama. He doesn’t have the skill set to facilitate a normal budget process or any other bipartisan legislation, and he remains ideologically committed to dogmatic positions. Under this president, how can you get anything done in Washington except through brinkmanship and budget and debt-deadline dramas? After all, that is how the Democrats passed Obamacare in the first place. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid declared it was a budget issue and so did not need to proceed through regular order. But that’s ancient history.

‎At this point, Republicans in Congress should be Clinton-esque: keep talking and look active. They should present ideas and make sensible offers for compromise in public and in private. Republicans can’t change every mind, but they don’t have to. GOP leaders need to show themselves to be patient, thoughtful advocates of their position. More voters appreciate the reality of what is happening than the talking heads inside the beltway would have you believe.

But at the end of the day, Republicans don’t have the votes they need in the Senate — and those votes are not going to suddenly appear. There is no cavalry coming, and I give the shutdown a week at most‎. But the fight over Obamacare is not over.  Regardless of what happens with this round, everyone is going to live to fight another day.

Follow Ed on Twitter: @EdRogersDC‎‎

Ed Rogers is a contributor to the PostPartisan blog, a political consultant and a veteran of the White House and several national campaigns. He is the chairman of the lobbying and communications firm BGR Group, which he founded with former Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour in 1991.