November 18, 2013
This is one of the two photos in the Post's database marked "bipartisanship." It is a diorama with Peeps. "The 2012 Debt Ceiling Debate: The Spirit of Bipartisanship Returns to the House," created by Sara Hanks, 54, of Alexandria Va. Her description: In that both sides use any weapons at hand, including bombs and custard pies. (Sara Hanks)
This is one of the two photos in the Post’s database marked “bipartisanship.” It is a diorama with Peeps. “The 2012 Debt Ceiling Debate: The Spirit of Bipartisanship Returns to the House,” created by Sara Hanks, 54, of Alexandria Va. Her description: In that both sides use any weapons at hand, including bombs and custard pies. (Sara Hanks)

It’s a whole new week here in the PostScript Bunker (come to think of it, it is a brand new week in most places) and it’s been two days since last we argued about Obamacare, so let’s get to it. Today an oped written by three (Democratic) sitting governors has hit 4,800 comments. The governors insist that Obamacare is working, because of their states’ magical powers in trying to make it work, occasionally deploying bipartisanship despite their and their legislatures’ full knowledge that President Obama is involved.

This was greeted by gales of commentary laughter. Bipartisanship! Sure, some bipartisanship happened. And then everyone rode off on a dragon.

First off, it is asserted that we are all wasting our time here in PostScript:

Bora Bora

This article is not even among the Post Most. No one cares.

(Note, roughly at the time of the posting, it had scaled the Most peak. So we carry on!)

Second, it is dryly noted that these three governors are all Democrats.

Riggo1983

What do you expect 3 leftist governors to write? And by working, they mean more Medicaid sign ups. Have fun paying for that.

likethesoup2

This entire op-ed smells like it was authored by the White House. So the whole thing is like the ‘law’ itself – predicated on lies.

But Paroxisia thinks there might be some actual bipartisanship involved, particularly in the case of the red state:

I don’t think Kentucky’s governor could have done too much without a nod from Republicans.

cents or sense thinks a conservative argument could be made that cooperating with the law would mean more power for the states:

Seriously, if states didn’t take the (Medicaid expansion) money then the federal government stepped in to manage their healthcare market. So they have less money, less autonomy, and more dependence on big government. Who was the sucker?

Ashland, though, asserts, again, that we are all wasting our time here, because no conclusions can be drawn until forever from now:

It is too early to know if Obamacare works. All the column demonstrates is that there are some areas where people are able to sign up. Whether those signing up can keep the policy in the coming years depends on whether the risk pool is such that premiums and other expenses of the pool are manageable. It will be at least a year before there is any indication as to what the effects of the current signup period have been.

PostScript asserts that this is America, and we are free to draw as many conclusions as we wish at any point in time. In fact, she proposes a contest as to who can draw the most conclusions about Obamacare between today and one year from today. GO!