January 16
Then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton testifies in January 2013 about attacks on Americans in Benghazi, Libya. (Linda Davidson / The Washington Post)
Then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton testifies in January 2013 about attacks on Americans in Benghazi, Libya. (Linda Davidson / The Washington Post)

Short takes: The Senate Intelligence report on the Benghazi attack would have been a stronger and more credible problem for Hillary Clinton if the Republicans hadn’t insisted on putting a post-script, condemning her personally. Without that, it was a strong bipartisan indictment of the department she led. With it, it seems more partisan and more easily dismissed.

If you had been asked three years ago which organization would have done more to change our politics, the tea party or Occupy Wall Street, what would you have said? With the House’s recent passage of the budget, it looks like the tea party’s influence in Washington is dead. (It was barely breathing after the shut-down fiasco.) Meanwhile, Occupy’s message of income disparity continues to energize our political dialogue.

British politician Neil Kinnock once said, “loyalty is a fine quality, but in excess it fills the political graveyards.” That may be the fate of Bridget Anne Kelly, an aide New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie fired in blame for shutting down lanes leading to the George Washington Bridge. According to a friend, Ms. Kelly’s “unrequited loyalty to the governor is ‘unwavering.’” Sounds like a message to me. In other words, the friend implies, Ms. Kelly’s loyalty to Mr. Christie can stay unwavering or it cannot. It’s all up to how the governor treats her after this scandal has been investigated. And while we’re speaking of “unrequited,” I assume you’ve seen Bruce Springsteen’s brutally, funny smack-down of his No. 1 fan, Chris Christie?  Don’t mess with the Boss.