Speaker John Boehner (Win McNamee/Getty Images)
House Speaker John A. Boehner (Win McNamee/Getty Images)

“Explain to me why the core Democrat, the base, would shell out $50, $100, $5,000, whatever you’re allowed to give, because they heard there was an impeachment drive on?” MSNBC’s Chris Matthews asked me Tuesday night. “Why does that make you want to give more money?” The inspiration for the query was news that the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) hauled in $2.1 million in online donations over the weekend through solicitations that highlighted the possibility of impeachment. What is driving this is a desire to protect President Obama, who they view as being under siege by Republicans. To have his back. A desire that will surely increase now that the House has authorized House Speaker John Boehner’s lawsuit against the president.

We pundits say things all the time that we surmise to be true or that are pretty good guesses based on reporting, reader comments, hunches, etc. But a viewer in New York sent me an e-mail that gave credence to my hunch about the the Democratic Party base’s reaction.

I am one of those people who donated over the weekend, I donated $30. For some reason, I felt compelled to donate and I’m not even sure why… then I heard your answer to Chris’ question and thought, “YES! That’s exactly right!” You summed it up perfectly. Enough of this nonsense, enough of the disrespect, this is the last straw. I want to fight! Mr. President, we got your back… and I wasn’t even consciously aware of it, but I felt it…

Rep. Steve Israel (D-N.Y.), chairman of the DCCC, told the New York Times, “When they decide to obsess on suing the president, they shouldn’t be surprised that our base is as energized as they’ve become.” Now all that Democratic Party base has to do is show up and vote this November. Exercising the franchise is the best way for them to have Obama’s back. A check means nothing if it’s not backed up by a ballot being cast.

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Jonathan Capehart is a member of the Post editorial board and writes about politics and social issues for the PostPartisan blog.