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Rick Santorum says he’ll release tax records this week

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CORAL SPRINGS, Fla.--Former Pennsylvania senator Rick Santorum promised Sunday that he will release his tax records as early as Tuesday—and certainly sometime this week. CHRIS KEANE REUTERS Republican presidential candidate and former U.S. Senator Rick Santorum points to his supporters following his address Saturday at his South Carolina primary night rally in Charleston. Speaking to reporters following his first Florida rally, a spirited address to an enthusiastic crowd of more than 100 standing outside on a picture perfect sunny Florida Sunday, Santorum said wife Karen arrives home from the campaign trail on Tuesday and she will prepare the forms for release. “Hopefully Tuesday,” he said. “This week,” he added. Under intense pressure from rival former House Speaker Newt Gingrich in the days leading up to Saturday’s South Carolina primary, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney said Sunday that he will release his own records Tuesday. In a debate in South Carolina last week, Santorum said he does his own taxes and would release them as soon as he returned home from the campaign trail to get at the records. Despite a third place finish in South Carolina, Santorum told the Coral Springs crowd at his first public event in Florida that the Republican race is only beginning. “The inevitability of Romney has now been wiped away,” Santorum told reporters afterward. “I beat him, Newt beat him. The only state he won was his backyard. There’s a long way to go.” “I’ve believed this from the very beginning: Slow and steady is going to win this race,” he said. “Be a strong conservative—the kind that’s not going to blow up or blow away." Santorum is now vying to win back support from conservatives who want an alternative to Romney but rallied around Gingrich in South Carolina. He spent a good portion of his speech telling the crowd that Gingrich has been unreliable leader for the conservative movement. “When Newt was speaker of the House, within three years, the conservatives in the House of Representatives tried to throw him out. And in fourth year they did. Why? Because he wasn’t governing as a conservative. He didn’t live up to all the hype,” he said. “It’s great to be glib. It’s better to be principled.” Santorum promised he will spend considerable time in Florida before the Jan. 31 primary. And he was well received by the crowd, which at times chanted his name—which has been a rarity at Santorum events.  “Gingrich is a liberal!” one man shouted repeatedly as Santorum spoke.

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