Post-Newtown support for gun control fades quickly

March 26, 2013

Four months after the tragedy in Newtown, Conn., public support for new gun control measures has dropped significantly.

Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif. speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 24, 2013, to introduce legislation on assault weapons and high-capacity ammunition feeding devices. Congressional Democrats are reintroducing legislation to ban assault weapons but the measure faces long odds even after last month's mass school shooting in Newtown, Conn. The measure being unveiled Thursday is authored by Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California, who wrote the original assault weapons ban. That law expired in 2004 when Congress refused to renew it under pressure from the National Rifle Association. (Manuel Balce Ceneta -- Associated Press)
Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif. speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 24, 2013, to introduce legislation on assault weapons and high-capacity ammunition feeding devices. (Manuel Balce Ceneta -- Associated Press)

A new CBS News poll shows a majority of Americans no longer want more strict gun measures. The 47 percent who do is down from 57 percent shortly after the Newtown shooting and continues a trend of less urgency among the American people for new gun measures.

The number is still higher than it was in April 2012 (when it was 39 percent), but is now that same is it was shortly after the shootings in Tucson, Ariz., in January 2011 and lower than it was a decade ago, when 56 percent wanted more strict gun measures.

The White House promised after the shootings in Newtown that it would move quickly to introduce new gun measures and it would not simply allow the tragedy to fade from memory.

But as often happens, the urgency among the American public to get something done has faded over time. Democrats are now proposing a significantly scaled-back version of the White House's gun control proposal that doesn't include an assault weapons ban or a limit on high-capacity magazines. Those proposals are set for separate votes as amendments.

Aaron Blake covers national politics and writes regularly for The Fix.
Comments
Show Comments
Most Read Politics
Next Story
Anne Bartlett · March 26, 2013