Florida Gov. Rick Scott asked for lieutenant governor’s resignation, she says

Former Florida lieutenant governor Jennifer Carroll (R), who abruptly resigned last month after being questioned by federal agents about an illegal gambling scandal, says Gov. Rick Scott's (R) chief of staff requested her resignation within minutes of the agents showing up at her office.

Carroll told the Associated press that the whole thing happened in about 20 minutes and that she immediately agreed, though she maintains she has done nothing wrong and said the agents told her she wasn't under investigation.

‘‘In my military time, when the commander in chief makes a demand or request, then you say ‘Aye, aye sir,’ and you march on. And that’s what I did,’’ Carroll, a former Navy officer, told AP. ‘‘I thought it would be better to remove myself from being a distraction.’’

Caroll said she was taking photos in her office March 12 when the agents showed up.

Carroll performed public relations work for a group called Allied Veterans, which stands accused of running an illegal gambling ring while using a small fraction of its funding for the stated purpose.

Carroll says she hasn't spoken to Scott since March 12, but that she holds no grudge.

‘‘You know what I'd tell him? Thanks for the opportunity for the wonderful job that he afforded me," she said. "He afforded me to make history, to show to many minorities and women that they too can reach high levels, they have to just be prepared when the door opens."

Update 12:23 p.m. Scott's office says Caroll "agreed to resign."

“After Jennifer Carroll was questioned by law enforcement about her work for Allied Veterans, a company involved in a multi-state criminal conspiracy, our chief of staff and general counsel questioned her," Scott spokeswoman Melissa Sellers told Post Politics. "She agreed to resign, acknowledging her involvement with Allied Veterans would be a distraction from the issues important to Florida families. Out of respect to her and her family, we are not commenting further about her discussions with our office or law enforcement, except to say that she made the right decision.”

Aaron Blake covers national politics and writes regularly for The Fix.

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