Scott Walker opposes government shutdown over Obamacare

September 19, 2013
In this June 28, 2013 file photo, Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker speaks in his Capitol office in Madison, Wis. (AP Photo/Scott Bauer, File) In this June 28, 2013 file photo, Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker speaks in his Capitol office in Madison, Wis. (AP Photo/Scott Bauer, File)

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker (R) has been an outspoken opponent of Obamacare, challenging its constitutionality in court and rejecting federal funds to expand Medicaid under the program. But that doesn't mean he backs the current House GOP strategy to risk shutting down the government over the issue.

In an interview Friday, Walker said he has proven his commitment to standing in the way of the Affordable Care Act's implementation, having "done just about anything possible to alter that course."

"I believe the Affordable Care Act is anything but affordable, and will have a negative impact on the economy of my state," he said, adding that he would have preferred for it to have been blocked by the Supreme Court. "But I don’t extend that to the point that we should shut down the government over it."

"I support limited government," he added. "But I want the government left to work."

There is a straightforward solution to address the current predicament, Walker suggested: put the question before the voters next year.

"The way to resolve this is through candidates making the case in the 2014 election," he said. "They can make a case they’re going to come on in and put the power back in the hands of the people, not in the government."

Will congressional Republicans heed Walker's advice, or will they continue to pursue their collision course with President Obama and Senate Democrats? Only the next couple of weeks will answer that question.

Juliet Eilperin is The Washington Post's White House bureau chief, covering domestic and foreign policy as well as the culture of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue. She is the author of two books—one on sharks, and another on Congress, not to be confused with each other—and has worked for the Post since 1998.
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