One thing Obamacare offers: funny videos

September 30, 2013
Singer Jennifer Hudson is helping promote Obamacare as a "covert scandal manager." REUTERS/Andrew Kelly Singer Jennifer Hudson is helping promote Obamacare as a "covert scandal manager." REUTERS/Andrew Kelly

While it's unclear whether the White House's outreach effort will boost enrollment rates under the Affordable Care Act, at least it will succeed on one front: Americans will get some more amusing Internet videos to watch during their workday.

"Funny or Die" is producing a few videos to encourage consumers to log onto www.healthcare.gov, and on Monday it released one titled "Scandalous," featuring Jennifer Hudson, traipsing around Washington D.C. in a white trench coat, seeking out the dark underbelly of the nation's health care system.

Scandalous with Jennifer Hudson

But here's the catch: there is no scandal to be uncovered, because Obamacare solves everybody's problems.

Whether it's the 20-something son who needs to get on his dad's insurance, the working woman whose company's plan doesn't cover mammograms, or the young man who has asthma as a preexisting condition, they're all good now that Obamacare is kicking into high gear. "Girl, go find you a scandal," Hudson tells the woman who can now receive an annual breast cancer screening free of charge.

The best scene is when a member of Congress confesses to Hudson his problem.

"It's my mistress," he tells her.

"Finally, an actual scandal," she replies.

"She's pregnant, and she, uh, doesn't have health insurance."

So Hudson--who likes to be called a "covert scandal manager," though everyone in the video refers to her as the "fixer"--helps the cheating lawmaker log onto the government website, and he's set.

If only the actual Oct. 1 rollout would be so easy, White House officials wouldn't have a care in the world.

Juliet Eilperin is The Washington Post's White House bureau chief, covering domestic and foreign policy as well as the culture of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue. She is the author of two books—one on sharks, and another on Congress, not to be confused with each other—and has worked for the Post since 1998.
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