Toronto Mayor Rob Ford files for reelection

Toronto Mayor Rob Ford arrives for a news conference at Toronto City Hall, Dec. 10, 2013. Ford has put his name on the ballot to run for another term and was the first candidate to show up at City Hall when registration opened Thursday, Jan. 2, 2014, for the city's municipal election Oct. 27. (Chris Young/Canadian Press via Associated Press)
Toronto Mayor Rob Ford arrives for a news conference at Toronto City Hall, Dec. 10, 2013. (Chris Young/Canadian Press via Associated Press)

Toronto Mayor Rob Ford, whose recent admission to smoking crack shocked the political world, has filed to run for reelection.

Ford has long maintained that he would seek another term in the upcoming election, which will be held in October. He made it official Thursday morning, the first day he was able to file.

From AP:

Ford was the first candidate to show up at City Hall when registration opened Thursday for the city’s municipal election Oct. 27.

He promised “Ford more years,” the Toronto Star reported. He also called himself the “best mayor” the city has ever had.

“If you want to get personal, that’s fine,” he told reporters, according to the Star. “I’m sticking to my record, and talk is cheap. You’re going to see action like you’ve never seen before.”

He was more restrained on Twitter, tweeting a photo of himself signing up to run again and saying simply, “Just filed my paperwork for the 2014 election. Vote on October 27th.”

The conservative mayor of Canada’s largest city has said he would run again, even after the revelations last year about his drug use.

Ford has faced intense pressure to resign over that and other erratic behavior that has embarrassed many Canadians.

The Toronto City Council has stripped Ford of most of his powers, but he continues to receive support from some in the city’s more conservative suburbs. He first won as mayor by promising to “stop the gravy train” of government spending.

Ford likely faces an uphill battle in his quest for reelection, although polling suggests he's not quite a pariah and still retains a significant base of support.

November poll showed 62 percent of Torontonians said they wouldn't vote for Ford under any circumstance. But in Toronto, a candidate needs only a plurality of the vote, meaning Ford could still emerge from a crowded field.

One interesting tidbit from Ford's filing: He reportedly paid the $200 filing fee in cash.

Updated at 10:59 a.m.

Aaron Blake covers national politics and writes regularly for The Fix.
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