Alex Sink keeps an ‘open mind’ for future Florida campaigns

Alex Sink, who just lost her special election campaign against David Jolly in Florida's District 13 on Tuesday, is keeping an "open mind" about a rematch when the new representative gets put up to a vote once more. Sink, a Democrat who previously lost a Florida gubernatorial campaign in 2010 and served as the state's chief financial officer from 2007 to 2011, was not answering phone calls from reporters, so the Tampa Bay Times visited her condo. When the reporter said he was surprised to see she hadn't moved back to Thonotosassa, 30 miles from her new place in Pinellas County (Jolly often accused her of being a carpetbagger), she laughed and said, "Why wouldn't I be here? My lease runs until November."


Alex Sink delivers her concession speech, after being defeated by David Jolly for Florida's 13th Congressional District, at her watch party at the Hilton Carillon in St. Petersburg Tuesday evening March 11, 2014. In background is Sink's daughter Lexi Crawford and Crawford's husband Douglas Crawford. (AP Photo/The Tampa Bay Times, Dirk Shadd)

Steve Israel, chair of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, "hopes she will," he said on MSNBC on Wednesday. “This district will be competitive in November."

He went on, “I’m hopeful Alex and I can talk soon,” adding: “We’re going to try to suggest to Alex to view this not as a curtain closer, but as an overture.”

Jolly beat Sink by about 2 percentage points. During her losing gubernatorial campaign in 2010, she won District 13 by 51.1 percent. Obama won the district in 2008 and 2012.

Sink also told the Tampa Bay Times that a re-run in November would still be a tough race: "It's a 50-50 district but it still leans right because of gerrymandering. But I still think Washington is broken and needs better people."

Jaime Fuller reports on national politics for "The Fix" and Post Politics. She worked previously as an associate editor at the American Prospect, a political magazine based in Washington, D.C.
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