House Democrats raise nearly $12 million in July, outpacing House Republicans

House Democrats' campaign arm raised nearly $12 million in July, an impressive haul that includes a record-setting $7 million donated online.

The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee announced the totals Monday. Despite being in the minority and having virtually no shot at reclaiming the majority, the DCCC continues to rake in cash. It ended July with nearly $57 million in its campaign account.

The National Republican Congressional Committee raised $8 million and wrapped up the month with $47.5 million in the bank.

The DCCC's strong July total appears to have been driven by talk in GOP circles of impeaching President Obama and suing the president over his use of executive power. The DCCC raised its $7 million online from more than 400,000 donations, outpacing its July record by 50 percent.

The committee signaled late last month that it was having a productive fundraising period. It said then that it had collected $7.6 million online since late June -- when House Republicans announced their intentions to sue the president.

Republicans leaders have distanced themselves from calls to impeach Obama driven by far-right conservatives like Sarah Palin. But Democrats have sought to elevate impeachment chatter and present it as a real threat. They have also pointed to House Republicans' voting to move ahead with plans for the lawsuit against Obama over using his executive powers to alter the federal health-care law.

Democrats need to gain 17 seats to win back the House majority -- a goal that strategists in both parties say is unlikely. But thanks in large part to regular fundraising appearances by Obama, DCCC has been successful this year.

In the battle for the Senate, the National Republican Senatorial Committee says it raised nearly $5.5 million in July and ended the month with almost $27 million in the bank. The Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee has not yet released its July numbers.

Republicans need to pick up six seats to win the Senate majority.

Sean Sullivan has covered national politics for The Washington Post since 2012.
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