The Circuit:

White House spectrum: The White House said Friday that it will explore ways that it can free wireless spectrum currently used for government purposes to meet consumer demands for mobile airwaves.

President Obama released a plan that calls on government agencies to explore how spectrum being used by federal agencies can be reallocated for use by private-sector companies in the future. The White House also announced that it is investing $100 million to fund research into technology that deals with spectrum sharing.

FDA cybersecurity: The Food and Drub administration has decided to tighten medical device standards to protect against cybersecurity threats, The Washington Post reported.

According to the report, security analysts found that it was alarmingly easy for them to find the passwords for surgical and anesthesia devices, patient monitors and lab tools.

The FDA is now directing device manufacturers to spell out the way they will address cybersecurity risks and has issued draft guidelines that gives the agency the option to block approval.

Microsoft brings Office to iPhone: Microsoft Friday introduced a version of Microsoft Office for the iPhone, after a long period of speculation as to whether the tech titan would release its software to run on competitors’ devices.

Office is one of Microsoft’s most important and iconic products and has been a major selling point for Microsoft’s Windows Phones and tablets running Windows RT and Windows 8.

House adopts oversight IT Reform Bill: The House Friday voted to pass an amendment that will allow the federal government to change the way it purchases information technology as a part of the National Defense Authorization Act.

Changes include provisions to give more authority to agency Chief Information Officers to make budgeting and personnel decisions.

“Never again will someone have that title and have no budget authority or responsibility,” said Rep. Darrell Issa (R-Calif.) “When a program goes right, the Chief Information Officer is responsible. When the program goes awry, it’s his or her job to make it right.”

Hayley Tsukayama covers consumer technology for The Washington Post.

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