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Right Turn
Posted at 08:45 AM ET, 06/06/2011

Friday question answered

On Friday I asked who among the most recent or soon-to-be declared candidates (Mitt Romney,Rick Santorum and Rep. Michele Bachmann) would have the most traction in the GOP presidential contest.

Some picked none of the above. Nana1353 writes:

Paul Ryan is hands down better than any of the announced and about to announce candidates. He is the quintessential non 0bama. His modest, kindly and patient personality is a stark contrast to Mister Peanut’s brittle animosity and arrogance. He really reminds me of Abe Lincoln, one of our greatest presidents, a gentle giant. He may not be as seasoned as Reagan but he has the same calmness and confidence in his message. He’s willing to stick his neck out with real proposals while Barry O tries to mask everything he does with meaningless rhetoric. Pair him with an articulate youthful VP candidate such as either Colonel West or Senator Rubio of Florida and he’d be hard to beat.

As for the three I mentioned, Right Turn readers, unlike the mainstream media, are not underestimating Bachmann. TeeJaw argues:

Of the three, Bachmann will have the most traction. She is feisty and she doesn’t take the bait when liberals spin out their tiresome tricks. She’s smarter than the establishment Republicans, and conservatives like that. Conservatives really like her for not acting ashamed of being a conservative. Romney has already dealt himself out with his lame defense of Romneycare. Nobody believes him when he says he wants to repeal Obamacare. He’s toast, and all the money in the world can’t change that. If Republicans should be so stupid as to make him their nominee they will get 4 more years of Obama. Santorum would ordinarily appeal to conservatives, but a former senator who lost his last election bid is not a strong horse. His efforts now make him look pathetic. He’s a loser who carries too much religion on his sleeve. Non-believers won’t vote for him, and even religious believers don’t want a politician preaching at them. They go to church for that.

DonMega, I think, hits the nail on the head:

“Of the three, Bachmann is likely to have the greatest traction, which I define as grabbing and expanding one’s position in the polls. She has the support of a highly motivated base — the tea partiers — and she may be the only ‘tea party’ candidate in the primary. This will give her a degree of traction. Add in the fact that she is a new, fresh face and that augments any excitement surrounding her candidacy.”

As for the rest, DonMega concludes:

“Romney holds his present position due to his establishment in the party, and his fundraising efforts will allow him to hold that position for a time. But it is doubtful that Romney will be able to expand his position much, if any. He is a hopelessly flawed candidate (Romneycare anyone?) who was passed over by Republican primary voters four years ago in favor of another flawed candidate. Santorum is an also-ran who lost miserably in his home state the last time he ran for election. While support in his home state is low, his support nationally is even lower.”

The race is only now beginning in earnest as the field takes form. The media place undue emphasis on early, meaningless polls as well as money and organization. It’s better to have much of the latter two, but neither, as readers have figured out, is essential.

By  |  08:45 AM ET, 06/06/2011

Categories:  2012 campaign

 
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