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Right Turn
Posted at 08:30 AM ET, 03/19/2012

Friday question answered

Some readers thought a brokered convention would be good for the Republicans. Jmarie5 argues that “it would allow for the true conservative to emerge instead of what we were being forced to accept (Romney). The publicity and excitement would trump any of Obama’s campaigning theatrics.”DonaldELJohnson writes that a brokered convention would actually help Mitt Romney: “Mitt Romney would easily win a contested GOP convention in Tampa, Fl, and such a contest might help him beat Obama. After a long, hard-fought primary season, GOP delegates would see and realize that Romney is the only Republican who might beat Obama in 2012. By August, it will be too late for a ‘White Knight’ to organize and fund a campaign for president.”

Others warned against a convention fight. SmallIsBeautiful makes this case: “Regardless of who wins, if a broken convention happens it is a sign of a broken process. The primary is supposed to place the mantle of democratic legitimacy on the Republican candidate. It can’t do that if 2,000 party insiders/delegates choose the nominee in lieu of the millions of voters who turned out for the primary elections and caucuses. My recommendation is that the GOP needs to junk the current rules and move to a strict first past the post (winner take all) primary system.”

And MsDinoGal writes, in part: “The GOP needs a brokered convention like it needs a hole in the head. I think many on the right side of the aisle have forgotten what we’re really fight[ing] for (the future of American solvency) and who we’re fighting against (an extremely popular incumbent president with liberal ideology in his heart). What conservatives really need is to wake up and recognize that we need a nominee as soon as possible. There has to be time to get him polished up, put money in his campaign coffers, and smooth out his message.”

Others contend it will be over before the convention. Jvanm20001 argues: “Mitt Romney has the backing of the party organization, unlimited funds, and the support of most conservative pundits. It is hard to see how he could not get to 1144 delegates by hook or by crook.” Epigonigrp agrees: “I do not believe that there will be a brokered convention. There are a number of upcoming winner take all primaries. These primaries are in the next month. Mr. Romney should be the candidate to beat in WI, DC, DE, MD. . . . If victories in these states are not enough to move Republican leadership to Mr. Romney, then he has winner take all primaries that are scheduled later. Though these are open primaries, Mr Romney again should be the candidate to beat. These primaries are: CA NJ, and UT. With victories in these primaries, Mr. Romney captures more than enough delegates.”

The primary calendar s indeed moving in Romney's direction. With a blow out in Puerto Rico and a likely win in Illinois he’ll be well positioned for the winner-take-all races on April 3. A brokered convention would delight Obama. Months of wrangling and then if the winner of the popular vote didn’t get the nomination there will be weeks of recriminations. The idea that a white knight who’s been hiding or refusing to come forward could be cajoled to come forward with no vetting and no public support is, I think, preposterous. While the “perfect” candidate is always just one more narrative twist away, I think it’s about time to stop spinning tales and figure out a ticket and a message to dislodge Obama.

By  |  08:30 AM ET, 03/19/2012

Categories:  2012 campaign, Friday question

 
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