Most Read: Opinions

direct signup

Today’s Opinions poll

Would you use an app that tells you the partisan affiliation of products you're considering buying?

Submit
Next
Review your answers and share

Join a Discussion

Weekly schedule, past shows

Right Turn
Posted at 09:32 AM ET, 04/20/2011

How to debate President Obama

Continetti is guest-blogging for The Post.

The president’s interview with local Dallas-Fort Worth television reporter Brad Watson has gone viral. Obama clearly dislikes being challenged — he initially claimed he lost Texas in 2008 by “a few” points before Watson corrects him — and snaps at the reporter at the end. Here it is:

Politico calls the segment the “outburst heard ‘round the world.’” I was reminded of Brett Baier’s equally testy interview with the president last spring:

The president may not realize it, but he is basically providing the eventual Republican nominee with instructions for next year’s presidential debates. Obama is thin-skinned, and if you remind him of his failures or correct him on the facts, he becomes irritable and unpleasant — attributes Americans don't want to see in their president!

Granted, one doesn’t want to come across as obnoxious or rude when needling Obama. The Republican candidate can’t pull an Al Gore and stalk his opponent on stage. All the 2012 GOP nominee has to do is smile, remain nonplussed by Obama’s retorts, and gently remind the public that the president’s central economic initiative, the stimulus, did not deliver as promised; that his central social initiative, Obamacare, became law over the public’s objections and remains unpopular; that deficits and debt have exploded during his administration and that the president has done little to bring them down; that the president plays coalition, divide-and-conquer politics when he promised to govern through consensus and bring the country together. Obama will take care of the rest

By Matthew Continetti  |  09:32 AM ET, 04/20/2011

 
Read what others are saying
     

    © 2011 The Washington Post Company