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Right Turn
Posted at 01:30 PM ET, 07/18/2011

Koch derangement syndrome

Right Turn has reported on the occasionally extreme lengths to which the left, aided by George-Soros backed outlets and unwary mainstream reporters, has gone to vilify the billionaire Koch brothers, who give to conservative causes. Two more items jumped out at me, showing just how flimsy and silly the attacks are.

Bloomberg reports that the “scandal” involving Koch financial support for Florida State University faculty positions turned out to be a big zero:

Florida State University’s president said Friday that a faculty investigation into the hiring of two new economics professors revealed nothing inappropriate in the hires, but he conceded that the wording in an agreement tied to a $1.5 million donation from a billionaire libertarian’s charity opened the door for “undue influence” on the process.

Nothing happened, but it could, you see. That’s the best the Kochs’ opponents could come up with. For good reason, the university president feels vindicated. “President Eric Barron said he’s opposed to any memorandum of understanding that gives an appearance that a donor would have a role in the annual evaluation of a faculty member. Barron said a Faculty Senate investigation found no evidence the school compromised its integrity on the new hires in the economics department.”

As yet I haven’t seen stories from the breathless leftist Web sites that hyped the story acknowledging that this was, in essence, a scandal without a scandal.

At times, it does get fairly funny. This is not a headline from the Onion: ”Koch brother spread influence via blueberry farmer.” Dastardly! What’s next — the nation’s strawberry supply? The “substance” of the piece is even weirder:

Gordon Colby, who manages 5,000 acres of Maine blueberries, says he’d never heard of any billionaire brothers being involved when he decided to join a group lobbying for less government regulation.
“I don’t even know who the hell David and Charles Koch are,” Colby, 63, said in an interview. “I don’t know about the Kochs, don’t know who is funding Americans for Prosperity. But I like what they are doing on the local level.”

A blueberry stooge? Actually, Colby doesn’t give a fig about the Kochs; he just doesn’t like government regulation. The evidence for this berry scheme is that the Koch brothers give to Americans for Prosperity, one of many Tea Party-type groups. That’s it. When the farmer pleads, “I’m a farmer and I just want to farm,”the report zings him for not “providing specifics.” Good grief. Do you think the ACLU is spreading influence through shoe salesmen? Daily Kos through garage mechanics? (What I do know is that Soros is spending oodles of money on NPR.) At some level, this is insulting, both to readers and to the citizen activists who have views of their own and now have outlets through which to petition their government.

The irony of this is that very few voters know or care who the Koch brothers are. They do know that we have 9.2 percent unemployment and a president who wants to raise taxes in a dismal economy. So, I guess we shouldn’t be surprised that the liberal spin machine would rather talk about college professors and blueberries.

By  |  01:30 PM ET, 07/18/2011

Categories:  Conservative movement, Media

 
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