wpostServer: http://css.washingtonpost.com/wpost

The Post Most: Opinions

direct signup

Today’s Opinions poll

Should the United States fund the service program AmeriCorps? President Obama would increase its budget. Rep. Paul Ryan would eliminate federal funding for the program.

Submit
Next
Review your answers and share
Right Turn
Posted at 07:45 AM ET, 07/13/2011

Morning Bits

More questions need to be asked about the CIA analyst endangered by a White House-released photo. “[I]t’s no joke that the White House’s appalling insouciance and incompetence may have put an employee’s life in danger. It’s absolutely reprehensible. I wonder, though: Does it transgress any laws? Violate anybody’s duty to protect? Does anybody care?”

Less than meets the eye. “House Speaker John Boehner expressed doubt Tuesday about President Obama’s warning that if the nation’s $14.3 trillion debt limit is not raised by Aug. 2, the elderly may not get their Social Security payments. . . . ‘The treasury secretary is going to have options in terms of who should be paid and who shouldn’t,’ he said. ‘Yes, there are some debts that have to be rolled over. But there’s going to be money available on Aug. 3 and I think it’s way too early to be making some types of veiled threats like that.’”

More pre-race scrutiny of Texas Gov. Rick Perry. “For almost four years, Perry has resided in a lavish rental home tucked into the hills overlooking the capital city of Austin, a house that has been publicly financed to the tune of over $700,000 thus far. At a time when the language of belt-tightening drives grass-roots GOP politics like little else, Perry would likely face scrutiny over whether his personal lifestyle choices befit a candidate who has made vast spending cuts a cornerstone of his platform.”

Less support for hiking the debt ceiling than for getting our fiscal house in order. Gallup reports: “Despite agreement among leaders of both sides of the political aisle in Washington that raising the U.S. debt ceiling is necessary, more Americans want their member of Congress to vote against such a bill than for it, 42% vs. 22%, while one-third are unsure. . . . Independents tilt heavily against raising the debt ceiling, 46% to 18%, although 36% have no opinion.”

More attacks from Pawlenty will be sure to follow. “Second Iowa poll in as many days has Bachmann on top.”

Less to that “Boehner vs. GOP base” story line than the press has been leading us to believe, huh? “Angry John Boehner rallies GOP troops on debt limit.” Almost like there was no substance to the feuding Republicans reporting.

More bad news from Europe: “Moody’s Investors Service downgraded Ireland’s government bonds on Tuesday, saying the country was likely to need another bailout before its finances recover.”

Less support for the United States in Afghanistan. “In the months before his death by an assassin’s bullets on Tuesday, Ahmed Wali Karzai had quietly rebuilt his relationship with the United States and emerged as the most influential ally for American commanders and diplomats seeking to quell the Taliban insurgency in southern Afghanistan. They believe Ahmed Karzai, President Hamid Karzai’s half-brother and the leader of Kandahar’s provincial council, had started to evolve earlier this year from a self-interested strongman to a regional leader willing to take nascent steps to share power with political and tribal rivals.”

More support for the McConnell backup plan. The Wall Street Journal editorial board: “The hotter precincts of the blogosphere were calling this a sellout yesterday, though they might want to think before they shout. The debt ceiling is going to be increased one way or another, and the only question has been what if anything Republicans could get in return. If Mr. Obama insists on a tax increase, and Republicans won’t vote for one, then what’s the alternative to Mr. McConnell’s maneuver? Republicans who say they can use the debt limit to force Democrats to agree to a balanced budget amendment are dreaming. Such an amendment won’t get the two-thirds vote to pass the Senate, but it would give every Democrat running for re-election next year a chance to vote for it and claim to be a fiscal conservative.”

By  |  07:45 AM ET, 07/13/2011

Categories:  Morning Bits

 
Read what others are saying
     

    © 2011 The Washington Post Company