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Right Turn
Posted at 07:45 AM ET, 08/28/2011

Morning Bits

Israelis and other lovers of democracy can be happy that in the Jewish state there is a place even for “local voice of resistance against neo-imperialism in the Middle East.” But, for shame, it’s just highfalutin theft masquerading as journalism.

Republicans are finally happy. “AP-GfK Poll: Most Republicans happy with GOP field.”

We should all be happy to have a “great foreign policy/train expert . . . and such a great actor” as vice president. Read the whole, hilarious thing.

Mitt Romney should be happy about this: “Romney earns positive reviews from a broader group of Republicans than [Michele] Bachmann or [Rick] Perry do. Majorities of both conservative and more liberal Republicans hold favorable views of him, which suggests he may be able to stitch together a broader coalition of supporters than his rivals to win the GOP nomination.”

Algeria can’t be happy. “[D]ocuments taken from the Algerian Embassy [in Libya] suggested that Polisario mercenaries were trafficked through Algeria into Libya with the knowledge and complicity of the Algerian government. The documents indicated the Algerian government acted in support of [Moammar] Gaddafi’s regime throughout the civil war despite Algiers’ denial, according to the Web site.”

More Americans than ever are not happy with President Obama’s performance.

This will make proponents of energy independence from the Middle East happy. “The State Department said Friday that a proposed pipeline slated to carry Canadian oil sands to Gulf Coast refineries poses little environmental risk if managed properly, a decision that moves the controversial project one step closer to final approval.

You’d think China would be happy to have a tennis star. But it’s getting dicey: “China loves Li Na, the 29-year-old French Open tennis champion and the first Asian player to win a Grand Slam singles title. Her Nike ads are all over the country. The government of her native Wuhan, in the central Hubei province, has erected a statue in her honor. Youngsters are picking up rackets to emulate China’s newest and — with Yao Ming having announced his retirement from the National Basketball Association — possibly its most famous sports role model. .But does Ms. Li love China back? She generated a lot of chatter when, at the winner’s podium at France’s Roland Garros in June, she thanked her family and even her sponsors, but not China.”

Nothing to be happy about here. “The economy grew much slower than previously thought in the second quarter as business inventories and exports were less robust, a government report showed on Friday, although consumer spending was revised up. Gross domestic product growth rose at annual rate of 1.0 percent the Commerce Department said, a downward revision of its prior estimate of 1.3 percent. It also said after-tax corporate profits rose at the fastest pace in a year.“

This should make Texas Gov. Rick Perry happy. “Rick Perry’s candidacy has attracted strong initial support from Republicans who identify themselves as supporters of the Tea Party movement. Perry leads by 21 percentage points over the closest contenders among this group, Mitt Romney and Michele Bachmann.”

Obama can’t be happy that the National Labor Relations Board took this on. “President Barack Obama, emphasizing job creation in his 2012 re-election push, faces a drag on his message from his own appointees to the board created as a watchdog for workers’ rights. After picking the members of the National Labor Relations Board, Obama finds himself pressured by Republicans and business groups to distance himself from the NLRB’s complaint against Boeing Co.’s 2009 decision to build a factory in South Carolina.”

Many people are not happy about the latest stunt from Mayor Michael Bloomberg. “New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg will not reconsider his decision to exclude clergy from the ceremony marking 10 years since the Sept. 11 attacks, a spokesman said Friday. The statement comes despite increased pressure from religious and conservative leaders who say that even though the mayor has not allowed clergy at other services, he should make an exception this time.”

By  |  07:45 AM ET, 08/28/2011

Categories:  2012 campaign

 
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