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Right Turn
Posted at 07:45 AM ET, 08/03/2011

Morning Bits

Quite a headline. “What Obama’s missing: The guts of our governor.”

Quite a bunch left uncertain. “The two heads of the Senate Armed Services Committee told The Cable today that even they have no idea how much the debt ceiling deal will cut from national defense, because the specifics of the cuts are still unknown. Depending on which reports you read today, the bill to raise the debt ceiling and cut at least $2.1 trillion from the budget over the next decade is either a huge win for the Pentagon or a dangerous cut to the military budget that will ‘sap American military might worldwide.’. . . Sens. Carl Levin (D-MI) and John McCain (R-AZ) both told The Cable that the actual effect of the debt deal on the Pentagon will be determined by budget and appropriations lawmakers in both chambers after Congress returns from its one-month summer recess.”

Quite a lot of pivoting by President Obama on jobs, says the RNC.

Quite a bit of turn-a-blind-eye journalism by the MSM on Vice President Biden’s “terrorist” crack.

Quite a boon to the conservative movement. In the Obama era, Gallup reports there are more conservatives than ever: “The U.S. political culture is a broad mix of conservatives, moderates, and liberals, with conservatives continuing to be the largest group by a slight, but statistically significant, margin over moderates. This pattern first emerged in 2009, driven by increased conservatism among independents, and has since persisted.”

Quite a contrast: Rep. Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) vs. Obama. Ryan writes: “During the negotiations over raising the debt ceiling, President Obama reportedly warned Republican leaders not to call his bluff by sending him a bill without tax increases. Republicans in Congress ignored this threat and passed a bill that cuts more than a dollar in spending for every dollar it increases the debt limit, without raising taxes. Yesterday, Mr. Obama signed this bill into law. He was, as he said, bluffing. Nevertheless, the president still hasn’t shown us his cards. He still hasn’t put forward a credible plan to tackle the threat of ever-rising spending and debt, and his evasiveness is emblematic of the party he leads.”

Quite a compelling piece by Jamie Kirchick. “[Norway mass murder] Breivik’s ideology does not represent the same sort of threat that Islamism does because it is not shared by nearly as many people, governments or institutions. Aside from a handful of anonymous Internet postings, there have been no avowals of support for Breivik’s mass murder. . . . The only organizational backing for Breivik’s massacre appears to have come from a 12th century crusader outfit called the ‘Knights Templar,’ which, as far as we know, exists nowhere but in his own deranged head.” Read the whole thing.

Quite embarrassing. “After dealing with the debt crisis, Senate negotiators tried and failed Tuesday to end a stalemate over temporary funding for the Federal Aviation Administration, leaving 4,000 F.A.A. employees out of work and relying on airport safety inspectors to continue working without pay.”

Quite a myth that the speaker of the House is unpopular with Tea Partyers. “A majority of Republicans who agree with the tea party movement give House Speaker John A. Boehner (R-Ohio) positive reviews for his role in debt negotiations in a new Washington Post-Pew Research Center poll. The speaker’s high marks represent a crucial link between the highly energized political movement and the Republican establishment as attention pivots back to the 2012 election cycle.”

Quite a problem for Obama if he can’t win Pennsylvania. “The protracted slugfest over raising the national debt limit leaves President Barack Obama with a 54 – 43 percent disapproval among Pennsylvania voters, but he scores better than Republicans or Democrats in Congress, according to a Quinnipiac University poll . . .” Unfortunately for him, he’s not running against Congress. By a hefty 52 to 42 percent margin, Keystone state voters say he doesn’t deserve reelection.

By  |  07:45 AM ET, 08/03/2011

Categories:  Morning Bits

 
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