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Right Turn
Posted at 07:45 AM ET, 11/03/2011

Morning Bits

Worst campaign adviser, ever. “ ‘The actions of the Perry campaign are despicable,’ Mark Block told Fox News tonight. ‘Rick Perry and his campaign owe Herman Cain and his family an apology. Both the Rick Perry campaign and Politico did the wrong thing by reporting something that wasn’t true from anonymous sources. Like I said, they owe Herman Cain and his family an apology.’ ”

Worst day of the campaign — for any candidate, ever: “A third woman considered filing a workplace complaint against Herman Cain at the National Restaurant Association over what was termed aggressive and unwanted behavior, with invitations to his corporate apartment, according to a report in the Associated Press. Meanwhile, a radio host in Iowa said that the candidate had made ‘awkward’ and ‘inappropriate’ comments to staffers at the station during a visit earlier this year.”

Worst negotiating job, ever. The Obama team in Iraq: “[Condoleezza] Rice, speaking with The Cable to promote her new book No Higher Honor, said today that when the Bush administration signed the agreement, it was understood by both the U.S. and Iraqi governments that there would be follow-up negotiations aimed at extending the deadline — a step that would be in both the U.S. and Iraqi interest. ‘There was an expectation that we would negotiate something that looked like a residual force for our training with the Iraqis,’ Rice said. ‘Everybody believed it would be better if there was some kind of residual force.’ ”

Worst headline for the divide-up-Jerusalem crowd, ever: “Poll Shows 40 Percent of Jerusalem Arabs Prefer Israel to a Palestinian State.”

Worst-case scenario for the “green job” cultists, ever: “President Obama’s green-jobs agenda, the foundation of his 2009 Recovery Act, is facing harsh criticism from polarizing places: his own administration and tea party groups.”

Worst attack on a GOP candidate by an Iowa talk show host, ever: Steve Deace writes, “No one affiliated with our radio program has anything else to say about Herman Cain’s awkward and inappropriate comments made to our staff referenced in a recent Politico story beyond what we have already said. Sadly, those comments are no more inappropriate and awkward than Mr. Cain’s multiple positions on the sanctity of human life, his support of the TARP, his not knowing China already has nuclear weapons, and his refusal to defend marriage. The fact that someone so uninformed and morally inconsistent has made it this far in a crucial Republican presidential primary, only to finally be vetted by his personal life, is an example of why so many Americans have lost faith in the system. Instead of debating issues we debate cults of personality. This sort of personality-driven politics helped Obama get elected four years ago, and look how well that turned out.” Yowser.

Worst excuse for not coming clean on a controversy, ever: “Voters are entitled to know the facts behind the settlement and the alleged harassment, and they can learn them only if both sides are allowed their say. Mr. Cain and the restaurant association should ensure that this is possible by freeing the women to come forward if they wish.”

Worst CEO, ever? “When New Jersey governor Jon Corzine lost his reelection bid to Chris Christie in 2009, part of his defeat in a Democratic state was blamed on the post-Lehman mood. Having experience as a top executive at Goldman Sachs just didn’t help. But in March 2010, Corzine returned to Wall Street where he hoped to bolster his reputation, helming broker-dealer powerhouse MF Global. On Monday, the company announced it had filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection.” Sort of like the mess he left behind in New Jersey. (“New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie recounts: ‘I found out that that $500 million surplus was actually a $2.2 billion deficit. For the five months remaining in fiscal year 2010, 65 percent of the money was already spent. That was my “Welcome to Trenton” party.’ ”

By  |  07:45 AM ET, 11/03/2011

 
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