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Right Turn
Posted at 07:45 AM ET, 11/25/2011

Morning Bits

Mickey Kaus goes after Newt Gingrich on immigration. “This plan would apparently grant immediate, legal, non-citizen status to all illegals in the country who went home and obtained an easy-to-get guest worker pass from an employer. There would be no ‘artificial limits on their number’ — in effect, as many red cards would be issued as employers demanded. The catch is that in theory a red card holder would then be required to re-return ‘home’ when his or her guest worker pass expired in order to obtain another one. How many of today’s illegals — especially the one’s who’ve been here ‘for 25 years’ — are going to take this deal? If they don’t, will Gingrich immediately offer them Selective-Service style review? If so, his plan moves a lot closer to a near-term amnesty.”

Rep. Steve King (R-Iowa) goes in for the kill as well. “Iowa Congressman Steve King says the immigration stand Newt Gingrich articulated in last night’s debate is a problem for Gingrich. Gingrich said his proposal was the ‘humane’ way to deal with the problem, by giving some illegal immigrants who’ve lived here for years a pathway to legal status. ‘I think if Speaker Gingrich had that to do over again he might couch his language differently, at a minimum,’ King says. ‘… It is a form of amnesty.’ King says this ‘makes it harder’ to support Gingrich.”

If Gingrich goes into a nose dive, his immigration position may be why. “Now he appears to be in the thick of the contest for the nomination. His words resonate. If he is right, that he has been saying this for a long time without triggering a backlash, then he may be on relatively solid ground — but not before he’s tested by his rivals.”

A book deal goes down the tubes. “The book was about Rick Perry. And when he plummeted in the polls, our publisher dropped us faster than the governor could say, ‘Oops.’ (Granted, that took almost a minute.)”

When the White House goes bonkers, the Romney team concludes its ad hit a nerve. Romney adviser Stuart Stevens: “It is now my goal for every ad we make to so upset the White House that they will force [White House press secretary Jay Carney] to go out with his light saber and do his thing. . . . These guys have attacked Romney in one form or another hundreds — yes, hundreds — of times over just the last few weeks. . . . We’re not going to run this campaign by their D.C. Green Room Rules. These are the same guys who savaged Hillary, made Bill Clinton sputter that he wasn’t a racist, attacked good people on behalf of candidates like [former New Jersey Sen. Robert] Torricelli and [former Philadelphia Mayor] John Street. Sorry.” Game on!

Medicare chief Don Berwick’s nomination goes down to defeat.“The point man for carrying out President Barack Obama’s health care law will be stepping down after Republicans succeeded in blocking his confirmation by the Senate.” Berwick praised medical rationing, which was a no-go with Senate Republicans.

The Republican presidential field goes to great lengths to support Israel. Elliott Abrams: “With the exception of Ron Paul, every one of the Republican candidates on the stage at Constitution Hall is a strong supporter of the alliance between the United States and Israel. In Tuesday night’s debate as in previous outings, they stated in compelling terms their understanding of why the friendship and cooperation between Israel and our country is of great value to us. . . . Mitt Romney added a specific promise. He would, he said, make a visit to Israel his first foreign trip. . . . It would be a remarkable signal to the Middle Eastern states and to the Europeans that the Obama era of distancing from Israel is over. At a moment of instability in the region it would visibly restore one solid pillar: the American-Israel alliance.”

If Obamacare goes by the wayside under Supreme Court scrutiny, Americans will generally be pleased. “A new poll shows that most voters want the Supreme Court to overturn President Obama’s health care law, with opposition and support falling largely along party lines. Overall, voters oppose the law by 48%-40%, according to the Quinnipiac University survey. Democrats support the Obama health care effort by 70%-19%, while Republicans oppose it by 86%-8%. The Quinnipiac survey found independent voters opposed to the law by 45%-38%.”

Obama’s blue collar support goes south. “Although President Barack Obama’s overall approval rating remains steady, his standing among Democrats, and in particular among blue-collar Democrats, appears to have dropped, according to a new national survey. According to a CNN/ORC International Poll released Wednesday, 44% of Americans say they approve of the job the president’s doing in the White House, with 54% saying they disapprove of how Obama is handling his duties.”

By  |  07:45 AM ET, 11/25/2011

Categories:  Morning Bits

 
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