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Right Turn
Posted at 07:45 AM ET, 05/10/2012

Morning Bits

Unsurprising that all that “war on women” hooey hasn’t moved the gender gap numbers. “Women have consistently been more likely than men to say they approve of President Barack Obama’s job performance since his administration began in January 2009. Regardless of changes in the president’s overall approval rating over the past three years, which has ranged from a monthly low of 41% to a high of 66% among all Americans, the gender gap each month has generally held steady at about five to six percentage points.” Shorter: More women than men are Democrats.

Unsurprising that Rep. Paul Ryan (R-Wis.), on everyone’s short list for vice president, is speaking at the Gipper’s library. “It’s one of the hottest invitations in politics and in recent years it has almost become a rite of passage for any politician seeking to make a mark in conservative politics: Addressing the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and winning approval from the Gipper’s wife, Nancy Reagan.”

Unsurprising that Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) tells us that slashing defense was a goal, not a threat to Democrats on the supercommittee. “Sequester’s a tough pill to swallow, but it’s a balanced approach to reduce the deficit that shares the pain as well as the responsibility.” Actually, defense is the only area of the budget that’s already been slashed. I don’t think that Defense Secretary Leon Panetta thinks that it’s their “responsibility” to enact such cuts (he called them “devastating”).

Unsurprising that Democrats confess that President Obama’s opposition wouldn’t have changed the vote on banning gay marriage in North Carolina. “ ‘I don’t think it would have made a difference,’ said Jeremy Kessler, the campaign manager for the Coalition to Protect All NC Families, a group that fought the amendment. ‘On a personal level, yes, I wish he would have done it months ago, but as far as our campaign in North Carolina you could not have had a longer list of endorsers.’ ” It would have shown some political courage though, right?

Unsurprising that Vice President Biden was tooting the administration’s horn on Iran. But it’s equally clear that the administration’s policy isn’t working. The Republican Policy Committee reminds us: “President Obama’s own Director of National Intelligence testified earlier this year it ‘is precisely the intelligence community view or assessment that to this point, the sanctions as imposed so far have not caused [Iran] to change their behavior or their policy.’ Even The Washington Post editorialized last year about the Iran sanctions regime: ‘it’s important to note a stubborn reality: There has been no change in Iran’s drive for nuclear weapons or in its aggressive efforts to drive the United States out of the Middle East. If anything, Tehran has recently grown bolder.’ ”

Unsurprising that young people aren’t excited about turning out to reelect Obama. “Thirty-two percent of 18- to 29-year-olds in the U.S. workforce were underemployed in April, as measured by Gallup without seasonal adjustment. This is up from 30.1% in March and is slightly higher than the 30.7% of a year ago.” Yikes.

Unsurprising that Democrats are deluding themselves. But look who is the voice of sanity: “Carville: Wake up Democrats; you could lose.”

Unsurprising that Mitt Romney takes some glee in attacking Obama for flip-flopping. “Mitt Romney said Wednesday that he continued to believe ‘marriage is a relationship between a man and a woman’ and that he believed President Obama had ‘changed his view’ on the issue during a campaign stop in Oklahoma City. I believe that based upon the interview that he gave today, he had changed his view, but you’re a better judge of that than I.”

By  |  07:45 AM ET, 05/10/2012

 
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