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Right Turn
Posted at 07:45 AM ET, 06/07/2012

Morning Bits

A splash of cold water. “President Obama wasn’t on the ballot in Wisconsin, but Gov. Scott Walker’s decisive victory in last night’s gubernatorial recall is a stinging blow to his prospects for a second term. The re-election was a telltale sign that the conservative base is as energized as ever, that the Democratic GOTV efforts may not be as stellar as advertised, and that the Democratic-leaning ‘blue wall’ Rust Belt states of Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania will be very much in play this November.”

Wake up and smell the coffee. Liberals’ “rhetoric wasn’t just hyperbolic. It was strategically suicidal. The unions and their various apologists whipped progressive Wisconsin into such a frenzy — falsely claiming, for example, that Walker was about to unleash the National Guard — that the anti-Walker forces could no longer perceive political reality. Even after they lost a crucial state supreme court election in early 2011, Walker’s foes persisted in state legislature recall elections, also futile, that summer. Still not getting the message, they went ahead with the recall of Walker, and lost, yet again. Now it’s hard to see how the state Democrats can recover in time for the 2012 general election, or even the next gubernatorial race in 2014.”

Crying in their soup about Citizens United is misguided. “Yes, [Tom] Barrett was outspent heavily. But none of the money spent on Walker’s behalf would have been illegal before Citizens United either.”

Time to make lemonade out of lemons. “Even as Wisconsinites were voting for Mr. Walker, voters in two of California’s biggest cities, San Diego and San Jose, were approving ballot measures to trim their public-employee pension burdens. Public-employee union leaders are pledging to fight those new laws in court, just as their counterparts in Wisconsin and elsewhere are dismissing Mr. Walker’s victory as the product of out-of-state campaign donations. They would do better to engage governments in a good-faith effort to restructure and preserve public services for the long term. States and localities face genuine financial problems, and the unions share responsibility for them.”

You get more flies with honey than with vinegar. “ ‘This generation of Republicans,’ [Republican National Committee Chairman Reince] Priebus said last week in an interview with NBCPolitics.com, are ‘down-to-earth relatable people that, if they have to grab a weapon and run up the hill, they will.’ . . . To be sure, these Republicans have attracted intense support and opposition. [Rep. Paul] Ryan and [Gov. Scott] Walker don’t adopt the most strident rhetoric, relative to many other conservatives. But their aw-shucks approach to politics belies the exceptionally aggressive reforms they’re willing to pursue in hopes of cutting deficits.”

A tower of Jello. “Frustrated Over Peace Plan, Nations Regroup on Syria.”

No use in crying over spilt milk. Plan B for Obama: “Walker’s survival adds more evidence that Obama and other Democrats face huge headwinds this November in states where those blue-collar whites dominate the electorate, as they do in Wisconsin. And that will increase the pressure on the president (and his party, in Congressional races) to maximize their gains this fall in states, like Colorado and Virginia, where an upscale-downscale coalition of white-collar whites and minorities can fashion a majority.” If he can’t win in Wisconsin is he really going to win Virginia?

The cherry on the sundae.

By  |  07:45 AM ET, 06/07/2012

Categories:  Morning Bits

 
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