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Right Turn
Posted at 07:45 AM ET, 10/25/2012

Morning Bits

Never dare the media to find fault with you. They will.

Never has there been a bigger contrast between a once idealistic candidate and a cynical incumbent president. “People are coming together. At the same time, I think in some respects they’ve diminished the President’s campaign because he’s now been reduced to talking about, you know, Sesame Street characters and word games and misplaced attacks on me. And he knows they’re false, of course. So, you know, with four debates behind us, including the vice presidential debate, the President’s been unable to find an agenda and to communicate an agenda and to defend an agenda.”

Never believe when people say voter fraud is a phantom problem. “Patrick Moran, the son of Virginia Rep. Jim Moran (D-Va.) and the field director for his father’s reelection bid, resigned abruptly Wednesday after a video linked him to voter fraud. The video — released earlier in the day by Project Veritas, a conservative organization headed by the Republican activist James O’Keefe — revealed that the younger Moran had weighed options for helping an undercover operative cast votes on behalf of 100 people who allegedly weren’t planning to vote.”

Never have we had such a weak “recovery” for so long. Citicorp now predicting fourth-quarter GDP could sink to 1 percent.

Never made a mistake, never apologizes. Obama lets on that he has no regrets about doing Obamcare instead of focusing on jobs. The Wall Street Journal editorial board concludes: “He didn’t focus on the economy because he didn’t and still doesn’t understand how the private economy works. He doesn’t understand that incentives matter, or how government policies and regulation can sabotage growth. He really believes that government is the engine of economic prosperity. ”

Never act like a desperate, losing candidate or the press will think you are a desperate, losing candidate. “Losing campaigns have a certain feel to them: They go negative hard, try out new messaging very late in the game, hype issues that only their core supporters are focused on, and try to turn non-gaffes and minor slip-ups by their opponents into massive, election-turning scandals. . . . A winning presidential campaign would not normally be hyping non-issues like Big Bird and ‘binders full of women’ in its quest for a closing argument, or rolling out a new spin on its second-term agenda with just two weeks left in the race, or pushing so many advertising chips into dishonest attacks on its rival’s position on abortion. A winning presidential campaign would typically be talking about the issues that voters cite as most important — jobs, the economy, the deficit — rather than trying to bring up Planned Parenthood and PBS at every opportunity. A winning presidential campaign would not typically have coined the term ‘Romnesia,’ let alone worked it into their candidate’s speeches.”

Never underestimate the media’s determination to overlook the obvious if it adversely affects their candidate. “[T]he story of Benghazi is that while the White House’s initial response may have been confusion (because other attacks were taking place at the same time), very soon thereafter, the outright lying began. And now that we have seen the e-mails that went to the White House within two hours of the attack naming the perpetrators — a known terrorist group operating in eastern Libya — the fact that officials from the president on down were intentionally and falsely insisting the 9/11/12 attack was not an act of terrorism is screamingly obvious.”

By  |  07:45 AM ET, 10/25/2012

 
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