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Right Turn
Posted at 07:45 AM ET, 11/04/2012

Morning Bits

Indictment. “What we saw today is that the unemployment rate is higher than the day that President Obama came into office. What we are seeing today is that 23 million Americans are struggling to find work today. What we see today is that 15 percent of our fellow countrymen and women are living in poverty. This is the highest poverty rate in a generation. The economy’s growing at less than half the rate that the President said it would be growing at, if only he could borrow a bunch of money and spend it on his cronies and in the stimulus package. We are 9 million jobs short of what he said he would accomplish.”

Cause of action. “Job one for the next president must be to fix the U.S. government’s broken financial model. If a private business had such cash losses and accruing liabilities, the turnaround team would seek immediately to cut costs and renegotiate the contracts creating the problems. The same must be done with our general budget, Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid, and federal employee commitments. Current retirees and those near retirement can be protected. But benefit promises to future entrants must grow no faster than the revenue collected to pay for them. . . . Beyond the entitlement programs, the federal government is in desperate need of a top-to-bottom review and reform. Unproductive programs must be shut down. Activities more appropriately handled by the states or by the private sector should be transferred or terminated. Duplicative federal activities must be consolidated. And federal agencies must be forced to deliver better value at less cost, just as every business must do to stay competitive.

Evidence. “More than just a number.”

Argument. “President Barack Obama defended the federal bailout of the auto industry Friday and accused Republican opponent Mitt Romney of trying to ‘scare up some votes’ in this battleground state by suggesting workers in China, not the U.S., are benefiting from his administration’s decision. Meanwhile, Mr. Romney, at a morning speech in Wisconsin, accused Mr. Obama of allowing the economy to take a back seat to the health-care law and criticized him as an overly partisan president.”

The advocates. “GOP outside groups challenged President Barack Obama’s dominance on the airwaves in several key swing state markets during the last week of October. Although Obama for America still aired more spots than Romney and his allies, his ads were outnumbered in nine crucial markets: Tampa, Cincinnati, Columbus, Miami, Toledo, Grand Junction and Dayton, Colorado Springs and Youngstown, according to new data released Friday by the Wesleyan Media Project/Kantar Media.”

Objections. “Obama In Ohio: ‘Voting Is The Best Revenge.’ Republicans quickly pounce on the comments.”

Misdemeanors. “House Oversight and Government Reform Committee Chairman Darrell Issa (R-Calif.) has asked Secretary of State Hillary Clinton to justify a lavish state dinner last May that cost nearly $1 million and featured entertainment by Beyoncé and food from celebrity chef Rick Bayless.” He doesn’t have bigger fish to fry?

With prejudice. The Center for Media and Public Affairs. “The Benghazi attack was depicted in terms related to a spontaneous protest (emphasized by the Obama administration) over four times as often as a planned attack (emphasized by Republicans) — 17% vs. 4% of the coverage, respectively. Terms related to spontaneous protest prevailed over those of a planned attack by margins of almost 7 to 1 (20% v. 3%) in the news pages of the Wall Street Journal, 5 to 1 in the New York Times (16% v. 3%) and Washington Post (20% v. 4%), and about 2 to 1 in the Los Angeles Times (12% v. 5%) and USA Today (13% v. 7%).” Read the whole thing.

The jury is out. “Mr. Obama has made the defeat of al Qaeda a core part of his case for re-election. Yet in Benghazi an al Qaeda affiliate killed four U.S. officials in U.S. buildings, contradicting that political narrative. . . . . If his Administration is found to have dissembled, careers will be ended and his Presidency will be severely damaged—all the more so because he refused to deal candidly with the issue before the election. America has since closed the Libya diplomatic outpost and pulled a critical intelligence unit out of a hotbed of Islamism, conceding a defeat. U.S. standing in the region and ability to fight terrorist groups were undermined, with worrying repercussions for a turbulent Middle East and America’s security. This is why it’s so important to learn what happened in Benghazi.”

Summation. Rep. Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) in Ohio on Saturday: “I am going to read you a quote from four years ago. ‘If you don’t have any fresh ideas, use stale tactics to scare voters. If you don’t have a record to run on, then paint your opponent as someone people should run from. You make a big election about small things.’ You know who said that four years ago? You do know who said that four years ago. That is what Barack Obama said in 2008. And in 2008, he appealed to our highest aspirations. Now, he’s appealing to our lowest fears. Just yesterday, he was asking his supporters at a rally to vote out of revenge. Mitt Romney and I are asking you to vote out of love of country. That’s what we do in this country. We don’t believe in revenge. We believe in change and hope.”

By  |  07:45 AM ET, 11/04/2012

 
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