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Right Turn
Posted at 07:45 AM ET, 11/20/2012

Morning Bits

Unsurprising. “Fifty-seven percent of Americans said Israel’s current military campaign in Gaza is justified, while a quarter said it isn’t, according to a new CNN/ORC International poll released Monday. Seventy-four percent of Republicans said the action is justified, compared with 59 percent of independents and 41 percent of Democrats.” Greater support for Israel among Republicans than Democrats has been going on for some time.

Unpopular, it seems. “Nearly 100 House Republicans on Monday called on President Obama not to nominate Susan Rice as secretary of State. In a letter to Obama, the 97 Republicans said the credibility of the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations has been gravely wounded by her account of the Sept. 11 attack on the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, Libya.” But the Senate is what matters.

Unhelpful. It’s not Hosni Mubarak’s Egypt. “While Trying to Mediate, Egypt Blames Israel for Gaza Conflict.”

Unlikely the French experience will impact American liberals, but it should. “You mean adopting an across-the-board self-proclaimed Socialist government and enacting measures that steeply discourage economic growth, has not done wonders for the country’s financial prospects? But how can this be?”

Unsafe to be a Hamas military leader. “An Israeli strike on a Gaza City high-rise today has killed one of the top militant leaders of Islamic Jihad, the Palestinian militant group said. The second strike in two days on the downtown Gaza City building that houses the Hamas TV station, Al Aqsa, has killed Ramez Harb, who is a leading figure in Al Quds Brigades militant wing, according to a text message Islamic Jihad sent to reporters.”

Unexpected. “Associated Press reporter Matthew Lee had a spirited argument with the State Department’s Victoria Nuland today over the administration’s refusal to condemn Turkish Prime Minister Erdogan’s labeling of Israel a ‘terrorist state.’” Watch the whole video.

Unprecedented? Hardly, but the precedent is bad. “Will 2013 be 1937? This is the question many analysts are posing as the stock market has dropped after the U.S. election. On Nov. 16, they noted that industrial production, a crucial figure, dropped as well. In this case, ‘1937’ means a market drop similar to the one after the re-election of another Democratic president, Franklin D. Roosevelt, in 1936. . . . Obama signed his health-care act in 2010, postponing much of its enforcement until 2013, after the election. Now that the effects of the act are so proximate, markets are wondering whether they or investors can handle the changes demanded. Roosevelt’s equivalents were threefold: Social Security, the Wagner Act and a new Federal Reserve law, the Banking Act of 1935, all passed well before the election.” Maybe this is the new New Deal.

Undoubtedly not how Hamas had hoped things would turn out. “Many believe this war began because Hamas thought a) the new Middle East order would be congenial; and b) because Fatah, which leads the other Palestinian government in the West Bank, was getting an unfair share of attention with its bid for Palestinian recognition at the United Nations. So what’s going to happen next? Israel has called up tens of thousands of reserves; a ground incursion into Gaza looks likely. Many more Palestinians will perish. And the vanguard of the new Sunni order? They’re going to betray the Palestinians of Gaza, because they always do. Worse still, all those angry and impotent members of the Organization of the Islamic Conference are going to head for the United Nations and support Fatah’s foolhardy quest for recognition.”

By  |  07:45 AM ET, 11/20/2012

 
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