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Right Turn
Posted at 03:04 PM ET, 03/26/2012

Santorum shows his angry side all too often

Rick Santorum blew his stack at a reporter who asked a question about what Santorum had said about Mitt Romney. Here’s the clip with the candidate calling a reporter’s question “bulls---”:

It’s a revealing and all-too-common occurrence. This is the Rick Santorum who bristled during debates when not given what he thought was his fair share of questions. This is the Rick Santorum who lashed out, calling it “crap” that he was being asked about contraception and the comments of his super PAC patron, Foster Friess. He also used this word to rebuke a reporter for asking about his comment that Puerto Ricans should learn English and make it their official language to obtain statehood. As far back as Ohio, he repeatedly lost his cool with talk show hosts when grilled on his rhetoric on hot-button issues such as contraception.

For starters, as a guy all fussy about family values, he should clean up his mouth. It’s not attractive for a presidential candidate to talk like that, especially one who is ostensibly so concerned about the debasement of our culture.

More important, how would he ever function in a general election when he is being attacked every day, nonstop? It’s doubtful he’d maintain his composure for very long. Indeed, when he asserted that Republicans might as well vote for President Obama as Romney, a number of conservative pundits intimated that he had “lost it.”

This is nothing new for Santorum. Molly Ball wrote last October:

The former Arkansas governor [Mike Huckabee] won over voters with his sunny outlook and sense of humor. “I’m a conservative, but I’m not mad at anybody” was his constant refrain.
Santorum, on the other hand, is mad at everybody.
In speeches, interviews and debates, his hallmark is a deep sense of grievance. He lashes out at the media that doesn’t recognize him as a contender, the world that seems to have forgotten his distinguished career and, of course, his inferiors in the Republican field. . . .
He can’t stop venting his all-consuming resentment. In a recent interview with the Los Angeles Times, he was still seething about a months-old slight: “In the first Fox debate, they asked everybody one question and then they didn’t ask me anything for 45 minutes. Like I was a potted plant. It was very frustrating.”
There’s no question conservatives are angry this year. They’re looking for a fighter who can take hard swings at Barack Obama. But what Huckabee knew is that there’s a difference between the happy warrior who likes his chances — and the guy with the massive chip on his shoulder.

Running for president demands enormous focus and energy. But it also requires level-headedness and personal maturity. Voters may be angry, but they prefer their presidents to be calm and professional.On this front, Santorum falls short and risks leaving a bad taste in voters’ mouths. If he can’t pull it together and clean up his language, he’s better off getting out sooner rather than later.

By  |  03:04 PM ET, 03/26/2012

Categories:  2012 campaign

 
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