Morning Bits

President Obama appears at the Brandenburg Gate in Germany. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/Associated Press)

President Obama at the Brandenburg Gate in Germany. (Pablo Martinez Monsivais/Associated Press)

Trouble still to come. “It is certainly true that healthcare.gov is performing better than it did on October 1. As others have noted, that is not saying much. But, despite the relentless cheerleading by the administration and its allies, no one should assume that the Obamacare website story is behind us. The real test of healthcare.gov is whether it is transmitting accurate data about those signing up for coverage to the insurance plans selected by the consumers. We have no idea if that is happening today, and plenty of reason to suspect it is not.”

The promise of “affordable” health-care insurance in the Affordable Healthcare Act is in trouble. “High Deductibles Fuel New Worries of Health-Law Sticker Shock.”

They are nothing but trouble in Vladimir Putin’s eyes. “President Vladimir Putin tightened his control over Russia’s media on Monday by dissolving the main state news agency and replacing it with an organization that is to promote Moscow’s image abroad.” For those who remember the Cold War, this is deja vu all over again.

Meanwhile the U.S. president is in trouble with the U.S. media, which recovered its independence recently. “For the last few weeks, the media has been having a quiet debate about whether or not to take a stand against using official White House photos in protest against being shut out of many White House events. On Monday, MSNBC anchor Chuck Todd took things a step further, calling the limited press access ‘a version of propaganda.’” That’s rich considering MSNBC employs Obama-worshiper Chris Matthews.

You know she’s in trouble if liberal foreign policy elites have trouble praising her. “Clinton was inconsequential; the real question, to her fellow liberals, concerns who they can blame for this. (Surely not Hillary!)”

Trouble in the gulag. “Audiences throughout Asia this morning were treated to television footage of a show-trial-style drama in which young Jong Un’s uncle, de facto regent Jang Song Thaek, is dragged from a Party gathering beneath the impassive gaze of his nephew after being publicly denounced by the country’s premier. This creepy, made-for-TV immolation of a North Korean royal opens a new and very dangerous era in [North Korean] politics.”

It would be nice if the president himself said something about the trouble in Ukraine. “Where is President Obama? [Susan] Rice last week repeatedly assured us of the administration’s commitment to human rights (‘advancing democracy and respect for human rights is central to our foreign policy.  It’s what our history and our values demand, but it’s also profoundly in our interests’) but neither she nor the President nor the Secretary of State has said much about the extraordinary events in Kiev. It’s time for them –personally, not through nameless spokesmen– to offer at least moral support to the hundreds of thousands of Ukrainians out in the streets, and to denounce the suppression of dissent by the Yanukovich government. It is not in the interest of the United States for Ukraine to fall back into the Russian orbit–nor for our top officials to remain indifferent and near silent in the face of the largest manifestation of a demand for freedom to occur in years in Europe.”

Also on Right Turn

Americans dislike Obama's Iran deal