Maybe President Obama will “pivot” to jobs again. “Americans have a new No. 1 problem. Nearly one in four Americans mention jobs and unemployment as the most important problem facing the country, up from 16% in January. The government and politicians had topped the list since the government shutdown in October.”

TOPSHOTSMen carrying children run out of a burning building following a barrel bomb attack reportedly dropped by government forces in the northern Syrian city of Aleppo on February 8, 2014. The Syria war has claimed more than 136,000 lives and driven millions from their homes, many of whom have fled to neighbouring Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan and Iraq, raising fears of a regional spillover of the conflict. AFP PHOTO/BARAA AL-HALABIBARAA AL-HALABI/AFP/Getty Images
Men carrying children run out of a burning building following a barrel bomb reportedly dropped by government forces in the northern Syrian city of Aleppo on Feb. 8. (Baraa al-Halabi/AFP/Getty Images)

Forget the White House spin on the deficit. “Government debt is twice as large a share of the economy as it was before the financial crisis. In addition to increasing the risk of another catastrophic financial crisis, high government debt squeezes out other functions of government, creates pressure for higher taxes, leaves policymakers less able to respond to future recessions, wars, and terrorist attacks, and lowers future wage growth. This problem will only increase as entitlement spending growth kicks into high gear a few years from now, but simply stabilizing debt/GDP in the mid 70s is an insufficient goal. Don’t rest on your laurels because deficits are smaller than they used to be. High government debt is a big problem.” Read the whole thing.

It’s Stephen Harper’s turn now to jawbone Obama. “The president is slated to hold economic and trade discussions with Mexican President Pena Nieto and Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper — the latter of whom is expected to give President Obama an earful over approval of the controversial Keystone XL pipeline. The Canadian government has vocally advocated for the $5.4 billion construction project, with Harper recently calling the extension ‘inevitable.’ That effort has only intensified since the release less than a month ago of the long-awaited State Department’s final environmental analysis, which said the pipeline wouldn’t significantly increase greenhouse gas emissions.”

A lot of Dems will swing around on executive orders when a Republican president tries to unilaterally stay all of Obamacare, but Jonathan Turley won’t be labeled a hypocrite. “The liberal ‘cult of personality” that has grown up around the president worries Professor Turley, who says we are ‘turning a blind eye to a fundamental change in our system. I think many people will come to loathe that they remained silent during this period,’ according to Turley. . . .He is not blind to the failures of those whose politics he’s in agreement with. Rather than simply pushing a partisan political agenda, Professor Turley is willing to call out his own side for violations of basic constitutional principles–and to do so in a thoughtful, informed, and civilized manner.”

What’s this about “revolve around the sun”? “Study: Democrats more likely to think astrology is scientific, less likely to know Earth revolves around the sun.” There are some interesting, nonpartisan answers why this is so.

Sooner or later Obama will circle around to his critic’s position. Unfortunately, about 150,000 have died. “[S.E.] Cupp said that the United States will be paying a heavier price for its military inaction in Syria than it would have had it intervened in the crisis. Cupp insisted that the president has not kept America out of the Syria conflict because he has rhetorically committed the United States to a course of action. ‘We are both in and out and our inaction and confusion has made this a more dangerous conflict,’ Cupp asserted.” Our allies in the region agree.

That’s quite an about-face from administration assurances that six months would be enough time to get to a final deal. “Talks with Iran over a permanent agreement on its nuclear program begin on Tuesday in Vienna, but there is little immediate optimism over a negotiation that is expected to last up to a year.” So what-s the back-up plan?

Jennifer Rubin writes the Right Turn blog for The Post, offering reported opinion from a conservative perspective.