U.S. Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki testifies during a Senate Veterans' Affairs Committee hearing that is focusing on wait times veterans face to get medical care May 15, 2014 in Washington, DC. . (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

They do seem sloppy. “Anybody can make a mistake, and that certainly appears to be what led to the Obama White House’s exposure of the top CIA official in Afghanistan this weekend. Unfortunately . . . this is not an isolated incident. In year six of the Obama administration, it speaks volumes about not just incompetence but immaturity and the skewed priorities that come with it.

The West Point speech was a silly idea and has only increased criticism of his foreign policy. He really had nothing new to say. “In his speech Mr. Obama could not defend his actual record, which is (perhaps with the exception of Burma) ruinous. So he opted for a ‘vision’ speech. But the problem here is that the president didn’t lay out a vision so much as invoked a myth. He doesn’t seem to realize that false claims, repeated ad nauseam, don’t become more true.”

Slowly, Democrats are echoing GOP calls to sack the Veterans Affairs secretary. “On Thursday, Sen. Mark Warner (D-Va.) became the sixth Senate Democrat in a  reelection campaign this year to call on Shinseki to go. Two of the most imperiled House Democrats — Ron Barber (Ariz.) and Carol Shea-Porter (N.H.) — issued similar statements Wednesday evening.” It’s a good thing we have elections or Dems would never show any spine.

Very shortly, Eric Shinseki may decide to spend more time with his family. “The White House offered tepid support Thursday for embattled Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki, skirting questions on whether he’ll soon be fired. White House press secretary Jay Carney repeatedly sidestepped questions about whether Shinseki retained the confidence of the president.”

I think Republicans are secretly thrilled Obama gave the West Point speech. The speaker of the House put out a roundup of the cruddy reviews the president got. “We applaud the president for delivering a foreign policy speech.  Unfortunately, the American people rarely hear from him on these critical issues. And when they do, it’s often more focused on achieving a short-term objective, such as leaving Iraq and Afghanistan, than making the case for why our missions there or other foreign policy decisions are important for our national security.”

Republicans should swiftly put out their own alternative. Gallup reports: “About one month after the new healthcare exchanges closed with over 8 million new enrollees, there has been little substantial change in Americans’ perception that the healthcare law has helped them. Most Americans say the law has had no impact on their healthcare situation, while those who do perceive an effect are more likely to say it has hurt them rather than helped them.”

Surely, Congress and states should be able to make it easier to hold mentally ill people for observation since their illness often prevents them from perceiving they have a problem. “Elliot Rodger’s murderous rampage near Santa Barbara has tragically exposed the limitations of involuntary-commitment laws that allow authorities to temporarily confine people who are deemed a danger to themselves or others.”

 

Jennifer Rubin writes the Right Turn blog for The Post, offering reported opinion from a conservative perspective.