All that money and effort down the drain. “For years, Hamas, initially with the aid of Iran and more recently through a combination of homegrown production and smuggling via underground tunnels, has amassed an impressive arsenal. . . . While the vast majority of Gaza’s population lives in poverty, Hamas uses its limited resources to strengthen its terrorist capabilities. With the deployment of Iron Dome, Hamas has discovered that all this investment was for naught. After six days of firing hundreds of rockets and missiles at civilian population centers, Hamas has, of this writing, failed to achieve the malicious goal of murdering an Israeli, though a 16-year-old was critically wounded by shrapnel on Sunday. This must be doubly aggravating for Gazans.”


Smoke rises after an Israeli missile strike in Gaza City. (Hatem Moussa/Associated Press)

Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) is getting thumbs down from lots of people these days, probably because the world has gotten so dangerous. “He will be he’s father’s son,” says Joe Scarborough.

Down the block the Democratic Senate nominee has made some enemies. “Is Bruce Braley chicken? That question is on the minds of many residents of Brooklyn and Holiday Lake, a 755-acre community of 300 families just north of town. From the Classic Deli and Ice Cream Shoppe to the Casey’s General Store, folks are talking about the hometown boy-turned liberal trial lawyer-turned congressman and his bizarre legal battle with a neighbor over her chickens. In the close-knit community, Holiday Lakers drive around gravel roads in golf carts and ATVs, waving at each other as they cross paths. Children play at the idyllic Powell Playground, and disputes are generally settled in an ‘Iowa Nice’ fashion. In contrast, Rep. Braley, D-Waterloo, the Democratic nominee for U.S. Senate, has ruffled feathers by launching a contentious legal battle involving a neighbor and her four therapeutic hens.”

Notice how Israel is taking down what Hamas terrorists are telling each other. “Hamas is in distress, and is searching for a way out of the conflict, according to evaluations by senior Israeli security sources. Hamas has sustained a ‘significant blow,’ one senior officer said, speaking on Monday, adding that his assessment is based on knowledge of what Hamas leaders are saying to one another.”

It’s sure hard to pin down the facts. “In contrast to the widely publicized enrollment numbers on the health care law’s individual marketplace, there’s apparently no way to know how many business owners and employees have signed up through the law’s new small-business exchanges. By all indications, though, it’s not very many.

That line about “ending wars” is going to go down as one of the dumbest in  the annals of U.S. foreign policy. ABC’s Jonathan Karl gets it: “[Y]ou see a wide range of people looking at a — you know, basically an all-out war, what’s looking like an all-out war in Israel, in the Palestinian territories. You see the situation with a terrorist group taking over vast territory in Iraq and in Syria. You see Russian aggression in Ukraine. You see just — concerns about Chinese aggression in the South China Sea. It doesn’t seem like a time to be touting tranquility on the international scene.”

Remember when Iran’s economy was down for the count? Not so much nowadays: “As U.S. and allied negotiators try to hammer out a nuclear deal with Iran this week in Vienna, they will have less economic leverage on their Iranian counterparts than they had a year ago. That is the conclusion of a new study from Roubini Global Economics and the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies, two groups that have analyzed Iran’s economy — and the international sanctions imposed on the country’s banks, oil exports and leading regime figures. Their report concludes that in the last year as the United States and other Western countries have begun to ease some of the sanctions on Iran as an inducement to negotiate an end to the country’s nuclear weapons program, the Iranian economy has begun to recover.”

Jennifer Rubin writes the Right Turn blog for The Post, offering reported opinion from a conservative perspective.