Most Read: National

Live Discussions

The Reliable Source

The Reliable Source

Chat transcript

A Clinton baby, a Clooney wedding and more from celebrity and D.C. gossip with Helena and Emily.

Weekly schedule, past shows

She the People
On Twitter Follow Us |  On Facebook Fan Us |  RSS RSS Feed
Posted at 04:59 PM ET, 07/09/2012

An execution in Afghanistan: ‘Long live the mujahideen’

The videotaped execution of an Afghan woman suspected of adultery has gone viral in Europe, and you can see an edited version of the atrocity at The Guardian, which reports, “When the unnamed woman, most of her body tightly wrapped in a shawl, fell sideways after being shot several times in the head, the spectators chanted: ‘Long live the Afghan mujahideen!’ (Islamist fighters) a name the Taliban use for themselves.”

The three-minute video, obtained by Reuters, is a dramatic and striking example of Sharia law enforcement by the non-government Taliban’s  disputed resolution methods.

My friend in London compares the execution, which took place in the village of Qimchok in Shinwari district of Parwan province, to what she had previously taken to be “over-the-top” plotting from a novel by Khaled Hosseini.

Coincidentally, I happened to watch another foreign film about adultery this weekend. In a Canadian production called ‘Take This Waltz’ by director Sarah Polley, the marriage of a happy Toronto couple — played by Michelle Williams and Seth Rogan — is  endangered when she becomes powerfully attracted to another man. In one scene about which much has been written, six women of various generations — all completely naked in a swimming pool locker room — discuss life’s difficult choices when the “new gets old.”

As the conflicted wife wavers, her sister-in-law, played by Sarah Silverman, in another standout performance scolds, “Life has a gap in it. It just does.”

Considering that matrimony is voluntary in Canada, the United States and the United Kingdom, I’m surprised how many first marriages stay intact. In these Western countries, it can take several false starts before one finds bliss, and close to half of marriages are legally dissolved.

In Afghanistan, where the divorce rate was last measured in 1979 and honor killings are common, there are also gaps.

And far worse than the painful lessons of missed chances and broken hearts is the tragic and often fatal treatment of “unchaste” women.

Bonnie Goldstein is on Twitter @KickedByAnAngel

By  |  04:59 PM ET, 07/09/2012

Tags:  divorce, Afghanistan

 
Read what others are saying
     

    © 2011 The Washington Post Company