Will the ‘Curse of Manaus’ haunt the U.S. soccer team ahead of World Cup group-stage finale?


(Getty Images)

Is the Amazon city of Manaus sucking the life out of the teams playing there in the World Cup? Based on a very small sample size: Yes.

Manaus and its white-elephant stadium in the jungle have hosted four World Cup games. The four teams that played in the first two all went on to lose their next games by a combine score of 10-3.

June 14: Italy 2, England 1

Italy next match: Lost 1-0 to Costa Rica

England next match: Lost 2-1 to Uruguay

 

June 18: Croatia 4, Cameroon 0

Croatia next match: Lost 3-1 to Mexico

Cameroon next match: Lost 4-1 to Brazil

The United States played Portugal to a 2-2 draw on Sunday night in Manaus and now faces Germany in its group-stage finale needing a win or a draw to ensure passage to the knockout round (though a loss also will do the trick depending on the result of Ghana-Portugal). The Americans, for their part, aren’t worried about any “Curse of Manaus.”

[Follow LIVE updates of today's United States-Germany and Portugal-Ghana games by clicking here.]

“I don’t think it was that bad to be honest. When it got down to it at night it cooled off and the humidity wasn’t as bad. I think after about 24 hours the bodies felt great,” U.S. midfielder Graham Zusi told reporters, per the Kansas City Star.

More from the World Cup:

Here’s how the United States can advance at the World Cup

Will FIFA suspend Luis Suarez over biting incident? History says yes.

Is FIFA doing enough to treat concussions in soccer?

Jermaine Jones’s present and past will collide vs. Germany

Klinsmann says World Cup scheduling has U.S .at disadvantage

Video: How the U.S. can advance to the knockout round

CONCACAF teams are serving notice

Thousands of American soccer fans make Brazil feel like home

Scores and schedule | Group standings | Stats leaders

Read more here: http://www.kansascity.com/sports/mls/sporting-kc/article620852.html#storylink=cpy
After spending the first 17 years of his Post career writing and editing, Matt and the printed paper had an amicable divorce in 2014. He's now blogging and editing for the Early Lead and the Post's other Web-based products.
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Cindy Boren · June 26, 2014