Quentin Tarantino dumps new project and spills the details; NBC quietly abandons ‘Murder, She Wrote’ reboot

Quentin Tarantino (Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)
Quentin Tarantino (Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)

Two projects fell apart in Hollywood last night, according to Deadline Hollywood: NBC declined to continue with a “Murder, She Wrote” reboot starring Octavia Spencer. Then, Quentin Tarantino decided not to go forward with his new film, Western drama “The Hateful Eight.” But both events unfolded very differently.

NBC let the world know the news by quietly confirming the news to the Web site. Tarantino, on the other hand, went apocalyptic; in an expletive-filled interview with Deadline, the director accused someone of betraying him and leaking the first draft of his script, forcing him to abandon the movie.

It’s never great when an artistic endeavor fails. But isn’t it refreshing when the reasons for the failure aren’t vague Hollywood-speak ?

Octavia Spencer (Kevin Winter/Getty Images for AFI)
Octavia Spencer (Kevin Winter/Getty Images for AFI)

The gist of what happened with “The Hateful Eight”: An obviously upset Tarantino — who says he’s “very, very depressed” about this incident — gives numerous suspects for the “betrayal,” claiming he only showed the script to a small number of people and someone started circulating it around town. He has a few ideas about the culprit, including various agents of actors interested in the potential film. (For anyone interested in the more insider details, read the Deadline report for a thorough list of suspects, where Tarantino instructs the reporter to “name names.”)

Anyway, the sordid details of “Hateful Eight’s” downfall give a much clearer picture of what happened — and let’s be real, a lot more publicity if he decides to pick up the project again (which he hinted that he could in the distant future). And shouldn’t that be the whole point?

The very idea should be so enticing — a step above the startlingly honest press statements trend we chronicled earlier this year — that the entertainment execs should think twice the next time they release a “no comment” or non-reason that a project comes to a sudden end.

Emily Yahr covers pop culture and entertainment for the Post. Follow her on Twitter @EmilyYahr.
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Emily Yahr · January 22