D.C.’s companies band together to showcase women’s plays

January 24, 2014

Molly Smith, Artistic Director at Arena Stage (Bill O’Leary/The Washington Post)

Forty-four theater companies in the Washington region have signed on to the Women’s Voices Theatre Festival, which will present 44 world premieres by women over an eight-week period in the late summer and early fall of 2015. What follows is the list, as of today, of the companies that have already recruited playwrights and the names of those writers:

Adventure Theatre, Karen Zacarias and Debbie Wicks Lapuma

African Continuum Theatre, Thembi Duncan

Arcturus Theatre Company, Marilyn Austin

Guillotine Theatre, Monique LaForce

Hub Theatre, Anne M. McCaw

Imagination Stage, Suzan Zeder

Keegan Theatre, Ursula Rani Sarma and Rosemary Jenkinson

Landless Theatre, Melissa Baughman and Irene Jericho

Longacre Lea, Miranda Rose Hall and Kathleen Akerley

Pinky Swear Productions, Amy Couchoud

Pointless Theatre, Patti Kalil and Mel Bieler

Quotidian Theatre, Audrey Cefaly

Shakespeare Theatre Company, Yael Farber

Signature Theatre, Heidi Thomas

Spooky Action Theater, Christine Evans

Theater Alliance, Katherine Clair

Unexpected Stage, Jacqueline Goldfinger

Venus Theatre, Claudia Barnett

Wait Don’t Leave Productions, Stephanie Carrie, Joanna Castle Miller, Azie Mira Dungey and Libby Heily

Washington Improv Theater, women ensemble and Young Playwrights’ Theater, multiple student playwrights

 

The companies that have agreed to participate but have yet to announce a playwright are:

1st Stage; Arena Stage

Compass Rose Theater

Discovery Theatre

dog & pony dc

Doorway Arts Ensemble

The Essential Theatre

Factory 499

Flying V Theatre

force/collision

Ford’s Theatre

Forum Theatre

The Inkwell

MetroStage

Molotov Theatre Group

No Rules Theatre

Olney Theatre Center

Round House Theatre

Spooky Action Theater

Studio Theatre

Synetic Theater

Taffety Punk Theatre

Theater J

Woolly Mammoth Theatre

 

Peter Marks joined the Washington Post as its chief theater critic in 2002. Prior to that he worked for nine years at the New York Times, on the culture, metropolitan and national desks, and spent about four years as its off-Broadway drama critic.
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