Hey Jimmy Kimmel, time to knock it off with the YouTube hoaxes

February 21

Hey, Jimmy Kimmel, it’s been fun (and by fun we mean annoying). Seriously, time to stop with the YouTube hoaxes.

On Thursday night’s “Jimmy Kimmel Live,” Kimmel revealed that he was the mastermind behind a video called “Epic #SochiFail: Wolf in my hall” allegedly taken by U.S. luge team member Kate Hansen at the Olympics. The 17-second clip, posted on Hansen’s YouTube and Twitter accounts, showed a wolf wandering through the halls of an Olympic dorm  in Sochi, with someone behind the camera whispering “Oh my God!”

The clip blew up online and media all covered it like a real story — which Kimmel happily noted Thursday when he revealed that (surprise!) he was responsible for yet another viral YouTube hoax. Turns out, Hansen was in on the whole time. Kimmel aired a compilation of all the news stations that eagerly covered the story: (Sample lines from news anchors: “There’s a wolf in the hallway and we’re not talking Blitzer”; lots of “Wolf of Wall Street” puns; and debate whether it was a stray wolf or husky.)

“That was not a Russian wolf; that was an American wolf,” Kimmel gleefully told the crowd. “And I know this because the wolf is backstage right now.” Interviewing Hansen via Skype in Sochi, she admitted there was “a little more backlash than I thought there would be” because security got involved when they saw the video. Kimmel instructed Hansen to tell anyone who gave her a hard time that America has something called “freedom of expression.” He then brought the wolf (named Rugby) on stage with its trainer. “This is how stupid our job is,” Kimmel boasted, showing footage of his team spending 15 hours creating a replica of Hansen’s dorm.

Okay, Kimmel, you’ve had your fun. You have now fooled the media multiple times (remember twerking girl on fire?), but it’s getting old — and irritating that every time something crazy happens on YouTube, people assume it’s just you. That’s not very fun. Plus, this video only got 2 million views, while the fire-twerking one had something closer to 9 million at the time of the deception. How about we put this prank to bed and you can focus on having celebrities reading mean tweets about themselves?

RELATED READING:

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Emily Yahr covers pop culture and entertainment for the Post. Follow her on Twitter @EmilyYahr.
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Emily Yahr · February 21