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Posted at 12:10 PM ET, 04/20/2011

Lunchline: A strange day around the world


Clinton Yates (Breton Littlehales - Post)
April 20 is one of the strangest days on the calendar in history. It's rather well-known as Hitler's birthday, the day the Columbine school shooting occurred and an unofficial holiday for people who smoke marijuana. But there are some lesser-known historical facts about the 110th day of the year: The old Tiger Stadium and Fenway Park both opened on this day in 1912.

The Dulles Metro station indoor/outdoor battle has taken another turn. One of the main arguments for the more expensive underground option is that it will save time and prevent travelers from battling the brutal elements after flying. So, the chair of the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors, Sharon Bulova, decided to make the trek from the terminal to the proposed stop herself, to see how long it takes. Tom Jackman, on The State of NoVa blog, reports on the trip.

In college, I knew a guy who was a prison guard. He told some stories that would make even the hardest guys blush. I can't imagine that things are much different at a youth detention center, especially one with the infamous history of the New Beginnings Youth Development Center, run by the District. The facility has had numerous escapes since it opened, and the latest transgression has proved to some that it's not a safe place for anyone. The Post's Allison Klein sat down with Officer Sylvester Young, who was beaten and locked in a room by two teens who broke out Monday.

I'm not a conspiracy theorist, so I tend to look at the work of the CIA as generally pretty cool. Maybe it's because I've seen too many movies, but I am inherently impressed by good spy work and technology. Tuesday, the agency released six of the oldest classified documents from the World War I era. Two of them reveal the long held secret of invisible ink, a staple of the intelligence community back in the day. The Post's Peter Finn reports on the items that CIA Director Leon Panetta said he had a "responsibility to share with the American people."

Thank God I didn't go to the Charlie Sheen show last night. I mentioned on Lunchline Live yesterday that this wasn't your average tour stop for the wildman actor, because the smarter-than-average D.C. crowd would probably be tougher than most he's used to. Apparently, I had that one right. The Post's Dan Zak was on the scene, live-tweeting and reporting on the event that marked the halfway point of Sheen's tour. You know an act has jumped the shark when the Salahis show up.

I think tonight's Capitals-Rangers game will be the most entertaining of the series so far. The Rangers are looking to tie things up and the Capitals desperately want to avoid losing momentum altogether. So what's their strategy? Start hitting people. Katie Carrera previews tonight's skate. Also, the Redskins' schedule was released last night, and holds one interesting detail: No Monday night games. Thank God.

Extra Bites

• Royal wedding fever is reaching its peak and is semi-taking over the offices at Express as well. Apparently, we're having a high tea office party to commemorate the nuptials on the day of the event. Maybe we can watch it on YouTube, since they've decided to stream the entire thing.

• Every once in a while, an invention comes along that reinforces your belief in the ability of humans to create useful things. This is one of those — just ask Alex Baldinger.

• I don't eat cupcakes, and one of the reasons why I don't is argued expertly by Slate's Tom Scocca.

Send your suggestions or comments to me at clinton.yates@wpost.com.

By  |  12:10 PM ET, 04/20/2011

 
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