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Posted at 12:54 PM ET, 06/30/2011

Lunchline: Bringing back the streetcars

A few friends had been telling me about this place called The Cajun Experience for some time, and I finally made it there last night. Good food, Louisiana vibe, and they have Abita beer on tap and in bottles. If that's your thing, definitely check it out.

Despite the shadiness on the part of some county leaders, Prince George's is forging ahead in the classroom. While students make progress in math and reading, former county exec Jack Johnson's wife, Leslie, who was found with tens of thousands of dollars stuffed in her bra when the feds showed up at their home last November, is planning public events. Mind you, she's still potentially the subject of a federal investigation. Johnson recently set up a "business card exchange" designed "for residents to meet with county officials who handle small-business issues, and minority contracting," according to The Post's Miranda Spivack. Two words, Mrs. Johnson: Lay low.


Sigi Smailys, a bartender at Biergarten Haus in the H Street Corridor in Northeast Washington, eyes the construction. (Sarah L. Voisin - THE WASHINGTON POST)
If you listen to my dad, he'll tell you fabulous stories about streetcars in D.C. back in the day. For years growing up I would hear about the glory of streetcars and always thought of them as a long-gone thing I'd never know anything about. Now that the city is making a major move to bring them back, I'm excited. Unfortunately, the project has been delayed by a year, meaning this generation's transit trend fix won't be satisfied until 2013. The Post's Sarah Khan reports the latest on the system that will stretch 37 miles across the city.

As an American born and raised in the '80s, I was socially indoctrinated to believe that communism is evil. Though I now realize that such drastic views on political movements probably aren't healthy, in China, the most populated place on earth, where communism is the way of life, things are different. People are not down with corruption, and are looking to reclaim the glory of a stateless society. The Post's Keith B. Richburg reports that "many Chinese are asking whether the party has lost its way."

Don't look now, but more change is afoot in the world of social media. MySpace is on CompuServe status, Facebook apparently runs the world and Google (which rules all things non-FB) is trying to create it's own social network. Faster Forward's Hayley Tsukayama reports on Google+, which was a thing, until it was a non-thing last night. Seriously though, if Google and Facebook ever merged, privacy as we know it would be cooked.

The Nationals are off tonight, but Ryan Zimmerman is still working. The face of the franchise has done everything in his power to raise money to cure mnultiple sclerosis, the inflammatory disease that's taken countless lives. Ryan has lived more than half his life watching his mother deal with the condition, and once a year, he holds "A Night at the Park," which benefits the ziMS Foundation. The Post's Adam Kilgore previews the event.

Extra Bites

• The National Enquirer is not exactly a super reputable publication, but in the last few years it has proven that it can break news about celebrity sleaze with the best of them. If the Enquirer is right about NBC Dateline's Chris Hansen cheating on his wife, then you can bet that "To Catch A Predator" will soon be canceled.

• Sheen alert: "Two and a Half Men" is coming back in September, and Chuck claims he did steroids on the set of "Major League." The movie reference is built in!

• No link here, but if you think planking is cool, you might want to research where it comes from. Operative word: slavery.

Check out my daily Lunchline Live chats at noon, or anytime on my Facebook fan page .

By  |  12:54 PM ET, 06/30/2011

 
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