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Posted at 03:24 PM ET, 01/04/2012

Melody Record Shop to close, Penn Camera files for bankruptcy — Which D.C. institution do you miss most?


Greg Shadley shops at Melody Records in Dupont Circle in 2005. (Kevin Clark - THE WASHINGTON POST)
After 34 years in business, Melody Record Shop — arguably D.C.’s “last general-interest record store” — will close its doors this winter.

The owners of the Dupont Circle store announced on their Web site this week that “technology, the internet and the economy has taken its toll, and we have concluded, unfortunately, that it is not possible to survive in this environment.”

And Penn Camera Exchange Inc., a local photography store chain, announced Wednesday that it has filed for bankruptcy protection and will close five of its stores.

“A dramatic decline in sales performance during the preceding holiday period has precipitated this action,” its Web site stated.

Customers who have left items to be repaired or processed can pick them up at the locations listed on Penn Camera’s Web site. Their E Street, Tysons Corner and Rockville stores will have clearance sales.

News of these closings follow numerous other retail losses in the D.C. area, ranging from brand-name chains to independent gems.

Here are a few recent closures:

• From Capital Business Blog: “Macy’s Inc. announced Wednesday that it would close five Macy’s stores and four Bloomingdale’s stores nationally this spring, including the Bloomingdale’s in White Flint Mall and the Macy’s in Laurel Mall.”

• Borders, facing bankruptcy, shut all its bookstore locations last year, and just this weekend, Georgetown lost its Barnes and Noble.

• In January 2011, a final round of martinis was poured at the Mayflower’s Town and Country Lounge.

• Hawk ‘n’ Dove, the longtime Capitol Hill watering hole, followed suit when it took its final last-call orders in September.

• Edward and Natalie Hughes, owners of The Bookhouse in Arlington, expect to close their 42-year-old shop in the next year or two.

“My parents have quietly stayed in the Bookhouse while the whole world has changed around them,” Natalie Coleman, the Hugheses’ daughter, said.

Tell us: Which of your favorite D.C. area institutions have closed their doors? Which place do you miss the most? Leave your comments below, or share your thoughts on Twitter and Facebook.

This story has been updated.

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By  |  03:24 PM ET, 01/04/2012

 
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