Lunchline: Smartphones are taking over the Internet


Robinson Cano of the New York Yankees gets a kiss from his father as he celebrates with his parents after winning Major League Baseball's Home Run Derby at the All-Star Game in Phoenix on July 11. (DENIS POROY/REUTERS)

D.C. Police Chief Cathy Lanier makes big bucks. Granted, being the top cop in the nation's capital isn't an easy job, but some people think her salary is climbing too quickly. A D.C. Council panel proposed yesterday to put a cap on compensation for city officials, specifically citing Lanier as an example of how to "avoid an unchecked upward salary trajectory." The proposal would also apply to DCPS Chancellor Kaya Henderson, one of four people for whom Mayor Vincent Gray sought above-schedule salaries from the council. The Post's Mike DeBonis reports on the recommendations, which the full council will vote on today.


PEPCO electrical crews work on underground utility lines in the Adams Morgan neighborhood of 18th street, NW as a renovation of the streets and sidewalks begin in the area in Washington D.C. March 2, 2011. (Gerald Martineau/FOR THE WASHINGTON POST)

I remember when landlines went the way of the dodo. About five years ago, it became a real sight to see a tethered phone in a home without a family. Now, a similar trend is underway for the Internet. According to findings released Monday by the Pew Internet & American Life Project, more people are using their smartphones as their sole online access point. The Post's Cecilia Kang reports on the mobile devices that "have turned much of America into an always-on, Internet-on-the-go society."

When the News of the World folded, it seemed like it could be a huge blow to Rupert Murdoch's media empire. But the downfall of the 100-plus-year-old British tabloid was effectively a blip on the radar for the man who controls the Wall Street Journal, Fox News and the New York Post, not to mention various media outlets across Australia. Murdoch has been dealing with scandal across the globe for his entire career. Foreign Policy's Joshua E. Keating chronicles the mogul's burned bridges.


A fan is held by his feet as he tries to reach for a home run ball in the outfield bleachers during the Major League Baseball All-Star Game Home Run Derby in Phoenix on July 11. (JEFF HAYNES/REUTERS)

Extra Bites

• When I was 10, I went to see John Singleton's "Boyz n the Hood" with my mother at Wheaton Plaza. She cried and held my hand at the end when Ricky's mom opened his SAT scores. She also didn't let me out of the house for a week after that. The Root has a "Where Are They Now?" gallery of the stars of the movie.

• The latest "Manners for the Digital Age" asks the question: Does love mean sharing passwords? Slate's Farhad Manjoo and Emily Yoffe discuss.

• You might have already seen this, but here's a cool time-lapse video of D.C. Or, there's the new Tintin trailer. (!!!!)

Check out my weekly Lunchline Live chat today at noon, or anytime on my Facebook fan page.

Clinton Yates is a D.C. native and an online columnist. When he's not covering the city, pop culture or listening to music, he watches sports. A lot of them.

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