The Fix: Master Archives


Declining vaccine rates: Mostly a white problem

Declining vaccine rates: Mostly a white problem

Americans have grown accustomed to reading about the various social and scientific phenomena that give white Americans -- on average -- longer life spans, better health and better access to quality health care than any other group.

The truth is a bit more complicated. And new data from a Pew Research Center poll examining American attitudes about a range of scientific issues suggests that the way that white, black and Latino adults think about vaccines is helping to drive another pretty complex but important health trend.

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Your online guide to Jim Webb

Your online guide to Jim Webb

A conversation with my editor:

And so:

Part 18 in a series: Your online guide to the presidential candidates. Each time someone decides to run, we'll do something similar, helping you navigate the online world around each candidate.

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Barack Obama: The health-care industry president

Barack Obama: The health-care industry president

The Daily Briefing's Dan Diamond noted something about the new jobs numbers.

That's true. In the past three months, the health-care industry has added 135,000 jobs. Between January 2001 and December 2004, the net job creation was ... negative-78,000. So not a super high bar, to be fair. (Using that standard, you could also say that the horse-drawn carriage industry created more jobs in the past three months than the entire U.S. economy between 2001 and 2004.)

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Support for polygamy is rising. But it’s not the new gay marriage.

Support for polygamy is rising. But it’s not the new gay marriage.

Opponents of same-sex marriage have commonly invoked the "slippery slope" argument for why it shouldn't be legalized. Once you let gay people marry, the argument goes, it could open the door to things like polygamy — or even bestiality.

Well, no one's married their dog since the Supreme Court's ruling last week, but in Montana, polygamists Nathan, Victoria and Christine Collier — inspired by the same-sex marriage victory — applied for a marriage license Tuesday. Nathan Collier said he plans to sue if it's denied and told the Associated Press: "It's about marriage equality. You can't have this without polygamy."

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Why Chris Christie is smart to wave the white flag on gay marriage

Why Chris Christie is smart to wave the white flag on gay marriage

After the Supreme Court legalized gay marriage, many Republican 2016 candidates tacked to the right, vowing to fight for religious freedom next.

Everyone from Texas Sen. Ted Cruz to former Arkansas governor Mike Huckabee promised social conservatives they'd use their increasingly limited means to prevent religiously conservative government employees from being forced to issue same-sex marriage licenses, or to grant protections for religiously conservative wedding photographers from having to shoot a same-sex wedding.

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Yes, a ton of people are running for president. It’s still not the record, though.

Yes, a ton of people are running for president. It’s still not the record, though.

The size of the 2016 Republican field, once eventually fleshed out with your John Kasichs and your Scott Walkers, is exceptional. At that point, there will be 16 major Republican candidates in the race. So many!

In a more accurate sense, though, there are more than 16 Republicans running. Already. Right now. As of earlier this week, there are more than a hundred Republican presidential candidates, joining 73 Democrats and a staggering 266 candidates who affiliate with no party or a third party.

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Surprise! Donald Trump is wrong about immigrants and crime.

Surprise! Donald Trump is wrong about immigrants and crime.

Donald Trump's two-week-old campaign has been pretty good at sticking to two core points: defending the candidate's anti-immigrant remarks at his announcement and pretending that the companies that responded to those comments by ending their business relationships with him were, instead, rejected by him first.

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OK, now Hillary Clinton seems to have some problems in Iowa

OK, now Hillary Clinton seems to have some problems in Iowa

This is the photo that probably kept a lot of people in Brooklyn from sleeping last night. At least, people at Hillary Clinton's campaign headquarters in Brooklyn.

The photo above was taken in Madison, Wis., a little more than 100 miles from the border of Iowa, where a reported 10,000 people came to hear Bernie Sanders speak Wednesday. The polling strength of Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker (R) in Iowa is almost certainly in part due to the proximity of his state, so all of those excited Wisconsinites aren't what Clinton's team wants to see.

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A history of U.S. severed relations with other countries, in 1 chart

A history of U.S. severed relations with other countries, in 1 chart

The imminent restoration of diplomatic links to Cuba brings to an end a 54-year split between the two countries.

The rupture between the two has been uncommonly long, by U.S. standards. A review of the country's diplomatic history as presented by the State Department shows just how uncommon it is. Looking only at complete breaks in diplomatic relations (and not breaches of "normal relations," a lesser disruption of a relationship), it's apparent that most have been far shorter than 54 years.

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Rand Paul says you can be a ‘minority’ because of your politics. Let’s break that down.

Just before 7 p.m. Tuesday, Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) a self-styled racial and political history resource all his own, shared this tidbit.

Trying to read the mind of an elected official or the meaning of any 2016 candidate's social media feed can be a risky business. But we'll make an attempt.

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