The Fix: Master Archives


What John Boehner’s brine recipe really needs is more dirt pudding

The award for most exciting Thanksgiving news dump of the year goes to Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio).

He delivered.

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How to explain who all these politicians are to the people who’ve never heard of them

How to explain who all these politicians are to the people who’ve never heard of them

Mitt Romney would beat Hillary Clinton in 2016 says a new Quinnipiac poll, if you set aside such considerations as "margin of error," and "it is 2014," and "one of those people has shown almost no signs of actually planning on running." Romney also leads the Republican field nationally, which is a bit like trying to call a 10k race involving sixth graders about 30 feet from the starting line. Long way to go, not a lot of separation -- and we have no idea what to expect from the runners.

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How Facebook plans to become one of the most powerful tools in politics

How Facebook plans to become one of the most powerful tools in politics

Political campaigns are obsessed with two things: Telling every possible voter exactly what they want to hear in order to get them to the polls and cast the "right" vote, and telling them that message for as close to zero dollars as possible.

It's not a surprise, then, that Facebook has focused its social-Sauron eye on the world of politics. Already a focal point of political activity (of varying quality), the site has shifted its toolset to let campaigns target extremely specific audiences with very specific messages, for prices somewhat north of zero dollars. The end goal for the company seems clear: Replace, as much as possible, expensive, blanketed television advertising with much more immediate, much more specific ads appearing in users' feeds -- and then cash a whole lot of checks.

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7 things you didn’t read today (but should have)

7 things you didn’t read today (but should have)

1. Marc Fisher and Wesley Lowery discuss how the protests in Ferguson defy historical analogies.

But August’s violence in Ferguson broke the mold in three important ways — one of which is just unfolding now. These were rare suburban riots, racial violence coming to the very place where many Americans — both white and black — had fled after the urban unrest of the 1960s. These were the most significant explosions of racial frustration since the election of the nation’s first black president, and so Ferguson forced the country out of the fantasy that America had entered a “post-racial” era.

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The 27 worst headline puns made about presidential turkey pardons

The 27 worst headline puns made about presidential turkey pardons

On Wednesday, two obese birds will be sent into retirement in an opulent ceremony at the White House. The beneficent ritual happens in anticipation of the annual mass consumption of their unlucky brethren, as political precedent mandates.

Michael Pollan told fellow Post writer Tim Carman this week, “It’s sort of an animal sacrifice in reverse — instead of killing the one to stand symbolically for the many, we free the one and kill the many."

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Why speaking on Ferguson was a lose-lose proposition for President Obama

It was a night of split screens.

Even as St. Louis County prosecuting attorney Robert McCulloch was wrapping up a nearly hour-long recitation of the events surrounding the shooting death of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo. -- and the decision not to indict police officer Darren Wilson -- the White House briefing room was being made ready for President Obama to deliver a statement about exactly what McCulloch was announcing.

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Our rude and subjective assessment of the best place for the 2016 Democratic convention

Our rude and subjective assessment of the best place for the 2016 Democratic convention

The Democratic National Committee has narrowed its choice of possible 2016 convention cities to three: Philadelphia; Columbus, Ohio; and New York. As someone who has lived in two of those cities and has frequently traveled through the third, I feel as though I am well-positioned to offer an analysis of these choices.

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More than a third of Americans think illegal immigrants can’t stay

More than a third of Americans think illegal immigrants can’t stay

Here's a detail worth pulling out from a new Quinnipiac University survey on immigration: Thirty-five percent of respondents indicated that immigrants who entered the country illegally "should be required to leave" -- a high in Quinnipiac polling since early 2013.

When the polling firm first asked the question in April 2013, 60 percent said they favored allowing such immigrants to gain citizenship. That number is now below 50 percent, as the number calling for some sort of deportation has increased.

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The encyclopedia of executive power, as explained by President Obama

The encyclopedia of executive power, as explained by President Obama

President Obama's executive action on immigration inspired -- as his actions or lack thereof always do -- reams of criticism, both from those who disagree with his policy preferences and those worry about growing power in the executive branch. The complaints far outweigh any chance that the White House has to counter them, as decreed by the laws of the Internet.

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The rarity of a federal grand jury not indicting, visualized

The rarity of a federal grand jury not indicting, visualized

A data point from FiveThirtyEight's coverage of Monday night's events in Ferguson is worth pulling out. "U.S. attorneys prosecuted 162,000 federal cases in 2010," the site's Ben Casselman writes, "the most recent year for which we have data. Grand juries declined to return an indictment in 11 of them."

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