Political conventions had the Worst Week in Washington

OK, we admit it: We love convention season. Despite the lack of sleep, the August/September heat and the fact that we essentially neglect our families for two weeks straight, there's nothing quite like the scene that is the political convention.

All of that said, it's time the political convention did a little soul-searching.

We explain why in this week's "Worst Week in Washington" column:

These days, the confabs are little more than big parties for donors and activists, with virtually no utility beyond being three- or four-day informercials for the Republicans and the Democrats.

 

And now, even those two functions are being threatened.

To recap, over the past two weeks:

 

A significant hurricane forced Republicans to cancel the first day of their convention.

 

●Also citing weather, Democrats moved their final day’s session from a football stadium to a basketball arena, rendering the tickets of thousands of attendees worthless.

 

●Academy Award-winner Clint Eastwood turned the GOP convention stage into his personal improv club.

 

●At least three Democratic convention attendees compared Republicans to Nazis.

 

●Two GOP attendees threw nuts at a black CNN camerawoman and compared her to an animal.

 

●Both Republicans and Democrats conducted party business in a manner that would make Vladimir Putin proud, ignoring protests over voice votes that were either pretty darn close (in the GOP’s case) or clearly insufficient (in the Democrats’ case).

 

...

 

At this point, both parties need to rethink how to conduct conventions. Yes, the parties need to gather every once in a while. But this is getting ridiculous.

 

Political conventions, for having your already-ambiguous raison d’être called even further into question, you had the worst week in Washington. Congrats, or something.

Aaron Blake covers national politics and writes regularly for The Fix.
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