And the winner of The Fix’s #nextsuperPAC contest is……

When we asked you to coin the name of the next big-money vehicle expected to rise on the political landscape, we were expecting brilliance. Clever word play. Alliterative allusions.


Money.

What we should have also braced for: a deep cynicism about the role of money in politics.

To recap, here was the challenge: come up with a pithy name for the jumbo-sized joint fundraising committees that can now be formed in the wake of the Supreme Court's McCutcheon decision. By striking down the cap on the number of party committees, PACs and candidates a person could donate money to every year, the court paved the way for parties and candidates to band together to raise money, allowing individual donors to write a check for as much as $3.6 million.

Inspired by reporter Eliza Newlin Carney's success in coining the term "super PAC" back in 2010, we asked for your ideas of what to dub the #nextsuperPAC.

Here are some highlights of the discussion that ensued:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There were also plenty of submissions that reflected the partisan divide over the unleashing of these new methods of funding campaigns.

One reader wrote, "How about calling them Citizens Exercising their First Amendment Rights? A PAC is just another name for something we do together."

Another countered: "I call them a travesty."

In the end, the vote was close, but a majority of the newsroom agreed that one term best captured the reach of these still-hypothetical mega fundraising committees: "max-PACs."

The winner, Ellen Weintraub, may have had a built-in advantage, however, since she deals with campaign finance in her day job, as a member of the Federal Election Commission.

Separately, voters picked another submission as "most humorous:"

An honorable mention goes to Daniel Newman, president of MapLight, who along with "Octopus PACs," submitted ideas for our other two challenges, as well: renaming "outside groups" and "politically active nonprofits."

 

There weren't enough submissions to declare a winner in those categories, but please continue sending in your ideas.

Matea Gold covers money in politics for The Washington Post.
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