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Posted at 01:07 PM ET, 10/01/2012

Romney should find his inner underdog

Mitt Romney should make a virtue of a necessity. The race is trending against him, and he should use that energy and turn it back on Obama.

He should say, “The White House and its friends in the media are taking this race for granted; they think they have already won it.  In fact, they are taking you for granted, just as they have for the last four years.”

Romney could then say, “I think the president is going to be surprised on Election Day, because you can only fool the people for so long. I can’t think of one reason why a second Obama term would be better than the first, and neither can millions of Americans. . . . Now I haven't always been the best candidate, I know, and that is all on me. But being a good president starts with accountability, taking responsibility, admitting things aren't working and trying something else. That's what my administration will be all about.”

There are glimmers of this message in what Romney and his surrogates have been saying lately.

On Friday, Romney told voters in Pennsylvania that Obama was taking them for granted and assuming victory. (Not a perfect example, perhaps, because the Romney campaign is the one that had stopped advertising in the state when polls showed Obama pulling ahead. So who is giving up on whom?) And Obama's surrogates are saying that the media are using the polls to prematurely call the election for Obama.

But instead of these somewhat random and half-hearted attempts, Romney should find his inner underdog. He would certainly be more likable in that mode, and it might bring him back.  

By  |  01:07 PM ET, 10/01/2012

 
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