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The State of NoVa
Posted at 11:08 AM ET, 07/31/2012

Titans of Tysons Corner meet, start building city


An artist's rendition of the proposed new Tysons Corner skyline, with three buildings on the east side of Route 123 near Tysons I. The Tysons Central Metro station is across the street. (Capital Business)
The core of Tysons Corner will always be its two large malls, Tysons I and Tysons II (also called Tysons Galleria), on opposite sides of Route 123. The Lerner family developed Tysons I and then sold it, and it’s now run by the Macerich Co. The Lerners then developed Tysons II, sold it but still own valuable property around it.

Now we learn, in this piece by Jonathan O’Connell in Capital Business, that the chairmen of the two companies recently took in a Nats game together — Ted Lerner, who also happens to own the Nats, and Arthur M. Coppola of Macerich. And though details of that summit meeting weren’t revealed, we are getting our first look at what Tysons City on Route 123 is planned to look like in the stretch between the two malls, where the Tysons Central Metro stop will be. It’s the photo above, which shows a 395-unit residential tower looming over 123, a 524,000-square foot office building next door and a 310-room hotel, possibly a Grand Hyatt, all being developed by Macerich.

Across the street, the Lerners have launched an office building too, not shown in the photo. O’Connell’s story reveals that Macerich and Lerner have clearance to build without having to go through new zoning rules, as a result of prior deals with Fairfax County. This gives both developers a head start, O’Connell writes, as Tysons City starts to rise up quickly around the Metro, scheduled to open next year. O’Connell’s piece is here.

This post was updated to reflect that Lerner Enterprises no longer owns Tysons II.

By  |  11:08 AM ET, 07/31/2012

Categories:  Development, Tyson's Corner | Tags:  Tysons Corner, Lerner Enterprises, Macerich Co.

 
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