‘What Uber reinforces is not car culture, but drinking culture,’ a reader argues

December 29, 2013
(BBC / Hartswood Films)
(BBC / Hartswood Films)R

Welcome to the last reader feedback roundup of the year! In response to Brian Fung's column on if Uber reinforces car culture, reader fmjk said, "What uber reinforces is not car culture, but drinking culture. Now you can go out, drink, and not worry about a DUI."

Timothy B. Lee's article on Britain pardoning computer pioneer Alan Turing, who was prosecuted for being gay, after 61 years got a reaction out of a lot of readers. Among them was Cubby_Michael, who wrote:

While this has FINALLY happened, it's a shame it took such a very long time for them to clear his name. While we can't judge the past with modern sensibilities, it's a real shame that western nations had such codified homophobia. Imagine the amazing potential cut short solely because society couldn't deal with Turing as he was. If they had only allowed him liberty to do his best for as long he was able, there's no telling how many amazing advances he might have been capable of.

Still, I'll always be grateful to him for his work, both in computing and during the war. I imagine things would have gone far differently in both arenas if not for his efforts and involvement.

And when Brian Fung reported that a judge ruled that the character of Sherlock Holmes is in the public domain, reader Ombudsman1 was ready to respond with some good old fashioned sarcasm:

If we take away the copyright on Sherlock Holmes, then there will be no incentive for Arthur Conan Doyle to write new stories.

We'll be left in a vast cultural wasteland.

Hmmm. Maybe we should go back to 25 years on copyright.

Thanks for a great 2013!

Andrea Peterson covers technology policy for The Washington Post, with an emphasis on cybersecurity, consumer privacy, transparency, surveillance and open government.
Comments
Show Comments
Most Read Business
Next Story
Andrea Peterson · December 28, 2013