The Switchboard: Google will tell the cops if it thinks there is kiddie porn in your inbox


A photo taken on February 5, 2014 shows the Google logo on a wall at the entrance of the Google offices in Brussels. (GEORGES GOBET/AFP/Getty Images)

Published every weekday, the Switchboard is your morning helping of hand-picked stories from the Switch team.

Europe envies how the U.S. procures tech, but it may lack the military might to mimic it. The Switch's Nancy Scola explains how America's tech prowess has been driven by the defense and intelligence industries.

Google sees alleged child porn in man's e-mail, alerts police. A Houston man was arrested for alleged child pornography after Google noticed the images in his e-mail and alerted the authorities, Chris Matyszczyk at CNET reports.

Bitcoin isn’t a currency, Bitcoin advocates argue. Backers of the cryptocurrency Bitcoin are arguing it is not a currency in a Florida money laundering case, the Switch's Brian Fung reports.

Facebook-backed app offers free Internet access in Zambia. Internet.org, a partnership between tech companies to help those in the developing world get online that was announced by Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg last year, is launching its first consumer-facing tool. The app, which will let people use online career, research and health resources for free, launched in Zambia last week, the Switch's Hayley Tsukayama reports.

Wiretapped: Israel eavesdropped on John Kerry in Mideast talks. German Magazine Der Spiegel reports that Israel eavesdropped on U.S. Secretary of State John F. Kerry during peace talks last year. "Kerry spoke regularly with high-ranking negotiating partners in the Middle East," Der Spiegel claims. "At the time, some of these calls were not made on encrypted equipment, but instead on normal telephones, with the conversations transmitted by satellite." Israeli intelligence intercepted some of those unencrypted calls, Der Spiegel reports.

Andrea Peterson covers technology policy for The Washington Post, with an emphasis on cybersecurity, consumer privacy, transparency, surveillance and open government.
Comments
Show Comments
Most Read Business
Next Story
Nancy Scola · August 1